A Database of New Urbanist Projects in Florida

NOTE: The projects listed on this page are those that were described in the 2005 Guidebook to New Urbanism in Florida.

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A

Abacoa

Aqua

Aragon

Atlantic Grove

Avonlea

Avalon Park

B

Baldwin Park

Belmont Heights

Botanica/Sea Plum

Brytan

C

Cagan Crossings

Cape Coral Downtown

Celebration

Citrus Park Village

CityPlace

Courtyards of Delray

E

Eagle Creek Village Center

East Village

F

Fort Pierce Waterfront

H

Haile Village Center

Hialeah Downtown

J

Jordan Commons

K

Kendall Downtown

L

Lake Burden and Lake Sawyer Neighborhoods

Longleaf

Lyman Village

M

Miami Lakes Town Center

Miami Springs Downtown

Mizner Park

Moss Park Community

N

Naples Fifth Avenue South

Naranja Lakes

Northlake Park at Lake Nona

O

Old Palm Grove

Old San Carlos Boulevard

Osceola Woods

P

Park Avenue Plan

Pointe West

R

Rosemary Beach

S

Seaside

South Miami Hometown

SouthWood

St. Croix

Stuart Redevelopment Area

T

Town of Tioga

U

University Heights

V

Village of Bridgewater

W

Washington Ridge

WaterSound Beach

Westlake Neighborhood

West Park Village

WindMark Beach

Winter Park Village

Winter Springs Town Center

Winthrop


Abacoa

Location: Jupiter, Florida

Status: Core infrastructure, 75% complete; housing and commercial, approximately 30% complete. Construction completed on primary roadways; secondary roadways to be completed by 2003. Phase I surface water management system and greenway system, including a 60-acre tortoise preserve, constructed; construction of the remaining greenways is underway. Single-family homes and townhomes are occupied in six neighborhoods, and a custom-home neighborhood and two multi-family parcels are under construction.

Summary: A 2,055-acre master-planned, mixed-use community designed around the principles of Traditional Neighborhood Development. The approved plan allows for: 6,000 residential units; 931,400 square feet of retail; 1,971,720 square feet of office; a 130-room hotel with a 20,000 square-foot conference facility; and 123,000 square feet of offices; and town center with 20,000 square feet of offices, 97,500 square feet of retail space, and two parking garages. Adjacent to the town center is a workplace district and the Abacoa Plaza consisting of a grocery store and ancillary tenants.

History: The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation originally owned the land on which the Abacoa Community is situated. Conceptual design and site plan studies began in the early 1990s. The Development of Regional Impact submission was approved in June 1995. Infrastructure construction began in January 1997. The Abacoa Development Company was created for the development of Abacoa and is owned by Cypress Realty, Inc., and the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation.

Special Features: Main-street style town center, outdoor amphitheater, spring training baseball stadium, Florida Atlantic University MacArthur Campus and Honors College, public 18-hole championship golf course, 16-screen movie theater, 393 acres of open space including greenways, community intranet and television channel, and intermediate and middle school

Site Information: Abacoa is located in the Town of Jupiter in North Palm Beach County, Florida, 4 miles west of the ocean on the north side of Donald Ross Road in close proximity to I-95 and the Florida Turnpike.

Costs: At build out, not including land costs, project costs will exceed $1 billion.

Financing: Combination of special taxing district and institutional financing

Marketing: Abacoa positions itself as a unique mixed-use development located in the town of Jupiter, 4 miles from the beach, offering a sense of community and a family environment. Abacoa offers a cross-section of housing types, appealing to the full spectrum of buyers, from affordable to high-end, and a diverse mix of commercial uses.

Developer: Abacoa Development Company

Address: 675 W. Indiantown Road, Suite 203, Jupiter, FL
Phone: 561-745-6403
Email: abacoadevco@abacoa.com

Architects: Duany Plater-Zyberk & Company

Calthorpe Associates

Moule and Polyzoides Architects

Landscape Architect: Gentile, Holloway, O’Mahoney & Associates, Inc.

Address: 1907 Commerce Lane, Suite 101, Jupiter, FL 33458
Phone: 561-575-9557
Email: ggentile@landscape_architects.com

Public Official: Sam Shannon,

Director of Community Development

Address: Town of Jupiter, 210 Military Trail,
Jupiter, FL 33458
Phone: 561-746-5134
Email: sams@jupiter.fl.us

Directions: I-95 to Donald Ross Road, go east to Central Blvd. and then turn left into the main entrance, or take the Florida Turnpike to PGA Blvd., go east to Central Blvd., and then north to the main entrance.

Aqua

Location: Miami Beach, Florida

Status: Under construction

Summary: The master plan with defined tree-lined streets and squares is made up of an open network of small city blocks. The majority of streets is oriented east west towards the Indian Creek waterway and are intimate in scale, of narrow width, and lined with townhouses. Each block has a service lane that provides access to the garages. The central street is aligned to terminate in views of the central square and Indian Creek, and three short east-west streets cross the site visually connecting both sides of the canal. A linear promenade along the waterway makes the waterfront a public amenity. Small plazas and greens are distributed evenly throughout the site. Many of the residents’ daily needs will be provided within walking distance of their homes

History: The site is the former location of a hospital. Dacra engaged Duany Plater-Zyberk & Company to develop the master plan and involved 10 architects in the design of the mid-rise buildings and townhomes. The building types are based on the urban requirements of the plan, which provides the setting for a wide array of architects with the objective of creating a pedestrian-oriented place of true character.

Special Features: Waterfront pedestrian promenade on the perimeter of the island; mix of mid-rise buildings and courtyard townhomes adapted for South Florida climate; Village Park; common plazas; art in public spaces; shared facilities, including a convenience store, office space, meeting rooms, day-care center, health club, swimming pools, and boat docks; and parking garage servicing the three apartment buildings

Site Information: AQUA is an 8.5 acres island village made up of 3 mid-rise buildings and 46 town homes designed to mediate two contrasting approaches to residential living: to the East, a high-rise condominium beachfront strip on AIA, and to the West, low-rise, single-family residential neighborhood surrounding the La Gorce Golf Course on one side and Biscayne Bay on the other.

Costs: $160 million

Financing: Colonial Bank

Marketing: Limited advertising, printed materials, web presence

Developer: Craig Robins, Dacra

Address: 1632 Pennsylvania Avenue, Miami Beach, FL 33139

Phone: 305-531-8700

Email: craig@dacra.com

Architect: Duany Plater-Zyberk & Company

Address: 1023 SW 25th Street, Miami, FL 33135

Phone: 305-644-1023

Email: ludwig@dpz.com

Landscape Architects:

Gary Greenan

Address: 600 Biltmore Way, Coral Gables, FL 33134

Phone: 305-801-8552

Urban Resource Group

Address: 420 Lincoln Road, Suite 353, Miami Beach, FL 33139

Phone: 305-673-2524

Public Official: George Gomez, City of Miami Beach

Address: 1700 Convention Center Drive, Miami Beach, FL 33139

Phone: 305-673-7550

Directions: From South Beach, take Alton Road north to 63rd Street. AQUA is on the south side of Alton Road.

Aragon

Location: Pensacola, Florida

Status: Infrastructure complete. Of 141 total lots, buildings are currently under construction on individual lots with four complete and five under construction.

Summary: Aragon consists of 141 mixed-use lots on 21 acres in downtown Pensacola, one block from Pensacola Bay and adjacent to the Historic District. Included in the neighborhood plan are Kid’s Park, Crescent Park, Gathering Green Park, a community garden, underground utilities, historic streetlights, brick-edged sidewalks, street trees, and alley access to most lots. Community structures include an entry arch, gazebo, roundabout with neighborhood clock, and a kiosk for the community garden. There are six building types including townhouses, cottages, park houses, side yard houses, small cottages, and row houses. The Aragon Design Code outlines the regulations for construction and development patterns of lots.

History: The City of Pensacola assembled several pieces of property adjacent to its downtown and held public hearings for community input and discussion to decide the future of the property. The hearings revealed that downtown residents and mixed-use properties were the greatest need and that a Traditional Neighborhood Development (TND) would most successfully meet these needs, as well as work sensitively within the existing urban fabric. The city issued a Request for Proposals for development of the site as a TND. The project was awarded to the Aragon Group at Pensacola, Inc., a group of local construction, finance, real estate, and architecture business people enthusiastic about the principles of New Urbanism.

Special Features: Aragon is a joint public-private endeavor, straddling two special review districts, and requiring the rewriting of the city’s land development code. Every lot in Aragon can have both a residential and commercial component in addition to having multiple dwelling units. Nearly all of the residents live and work in Pensacola. Aragon’s most unique feature is its location adjacent to or within walking distance of many downtown amenities: museums, theaters, shops, etc.; the historic district and Pensacola Village, including homes and structures from the 18th and 19th centuries; Pensacola Bay, providing views for the downtown community; St. Michael’s Cemetery, one of the oldest cemeteries in the State of Florida; Hawkshaw Lagoon, containing the Missing Children’s Memorial (the first memorial in the United States dedicated to missing children), and Veteran’s Memorial Park.

Costs: $4.2 million from investors and $1.4 million from the City of Pensacola for site development, including demolition, streets, sidewalks, alleys, streetlights, landscaping, underground utilities, and community structures

Financing: Investors’ capital, Whitney Bank, and the City of Pensacola

Marketing: Information is available through Montgomery Realtors and Sandra Ward Realty.

Developer: Michelle R. MacNeil, The Aragon Group at Pensacola, Inc.

Address: 105 E. DeSoto Street, Pensacola FL 32501

Phone: 850-434-3700

Email: mrmarch@bellsouth.net

Architect: Michelle R. MacNeil, Architectural Affairs, Inc.

Address: 105 E. DeSoto Street, Pensacola, FL 32501

Phone: 850-434-3700

Email: mrmarch@bellsouth.net

Public Official: Jennifer Fleming, Director, Community Redevelopment Agency, PO Box 12910, Pensacola, FL 32521

Phone: 850-435-1695

Email: jfleming@ci.pensacola.fl.us

Directions: From Interstate 10, exit at Interstate 110 South. Take I-110 until it ends at the Downtown/Pensacola Beach exit. Turn right at 10th Ave., which is the first block past the first stop-light. 10th Ave. ends at Veteran’s Memorial Park (two blocks). Turn right and go 1 block to 9th Ave. The Aragon entry arch is directly ahead.

Atlantic Grove

Location: Delray Beach, Florida

Status: Entitled; construction to begin May 2002

Summary: Atlantic Grove contains 55 three-story townhomes, and two mixed-use buildings on 4.7 acres. The mixed-use buildings contain a total of 20 residential lofts and 48,000 square feet of commercial space. The commercial space is being sold as condominium units. Prices for the townhomes range from the $130,000s to the $200,000s. The lofts were priced from the $160,000s to the $200,000s. The commercial space was priced from $180 to $210 per square foot.

History: The property was the subject of a Request for Proposals (RFP). Atlantic Grove Partners, a Limited Liability Corporation (LLC) formed by New Urban Atlantic Grove LLC, the Delray Beach Community Development Corporation (CDC), the Technology, Enterprise, and Development (TED) Center, and two local CDCs won the RFP. The property was assembled by the local Community Redevelopment Agency and is the former site of dilapidated commercial and residential uses. The residential portion of the community sold out in about 10 days. The commercial portion sold out in about four months.

Special Features: Pool, vertical mixed-use, 10 units set aside for persons with incomes below the median income, and specimen tree relocation

Site Information: Site contains 32 homes on 1.06 acres north side of West Atlantic Avenue between NW 3rd and NW 5th Avenues and involves a private-not-for-profit partnership, with 50% of profit reinvested in the community

Costs: $21 million

Financing: First Union National Bank, Charlotte, North Carolina; Local Initiatives Support Corporation, West Palm Beach, Florida

Marketing: Atlantic Grove is positioned as a mixed-use urban community on the western extension of Delray Beach’s vibrant Atlantic Avenue with restaurants, entertainment, cultural events, the beach, and employment opportunities are all within walking distance. The development is marketed by New Urban Communities, the Delray Beach CDC, and the TED Center.

Developers: Tim Hernandez and Kevin Rickard, New Urban Atlantic Grove Partners, LLC

Address: 398 NE 6th Avenue, Delray Beach, FL 33483

Phone: 561-279-8706 x 201

Email: thernandez@newurbancommunities.com; krickard@newurbancommunities.com

Bill Sanders, Delray Beach Community Development Corporation

Address: 400 W. Atlantic Avenue, Delray Beach, FL 33444

Phone: 561-266-9840

Email: sand_1050@aol.com

Seabron Smith, TED Center

Address: 33 SE 1st Avenue, Delray Beach, FL 33444

Phone: 561-265-3790 x 202

Email: tedcnt@bellsouth.net

Site Planner: Peter Aquart, Miller-Legg Associates

Address: 1300 Corporate Center Way, Wellington, FL 33414

Phone: 561-798-9981 x 23

Email: paquart@millerlegg.com

Architect: Scott Disher, Sean Naeger, Scott Blakeslee Disher Architects

Address: 2400 High Ridge Road, Suite 100, Boynton Beach, FL 33426

Phone: 561-733-8800 x 219

Email: snaeger@sbdassociates.com; sdisher@sbdassociates.com

Landscape Architect: Brad Swanzy, Land Design South

Address: 1280 N. Congress Avenue, Suite 215, West Palm Beach, FL 33409

Phone: 561-478-8501

Email: bswanzy@landdesignsouth.com

Public Official: Paul Dorling and Jeff Costello, City of Delray Beach

Address: 100 NW 1st Avenue, Delray Beach, FL 33444

Phone: 561-243-7041

Email: jcostello@delrayplanning.org; pdorling@delrayplanning.org

Directions: Take I-95 to Atlantic Ave. Go east to the site, located on the north side of Atlantic Ave. between NW 3rd and NW 5th Aves., just west of the Delray Beach Tennis Center.

Avonlea

Location: North Stuart, Florida

Status: Phase 1 is under construction.

Summary: Avonlea is a 44-acre mixed-use village located in the Community Redevelopment Area of Stuart, Florida.

History: Avonlea was conceived in the mid-1990s through collaboration between the developer and the Treasure Coast Regional Planning Council. Martin County sued Stuart over the mixed land use, creating delays and requiring the first phase to be a commercial/industrial project, which conforms to Martin County’s industrial land use. Master plan approval for the full project is expected in 2002.

Special Features: Avonlea is located at the crossroads between the northern Martin County communities of Stuart, Jensen Beach, and Rio. Natural wetlands and uplands are being integrated into the community.

Site Information: Avonlea is on Baker Road and SR 707. It is a 43.97-acre site with 12.45 acres of open space, 4.04 acres of building area, 6.71 acres of impervious area, 20.77 acres of preserve area, 12.37 acres of wetlands, 2.92 acres of buffer areas, and 5.48 acres of uplands.

Costs: $45 million

Financing: Conventional, grants, and equity

Marketing: Avonlea is marketed toward those wanting to be near the downtown and for its housing opportunities for all ages and family composition. Businesses that are looking to serve the local markets in northern Martin County are also targeted. Marketing techniques include print, web, radio, television, and realtor co-op.

Developer: Frank Wacha, Jr.

Address: PO Box 1610, Jensen Beach, FL 34958

Phone: 772-334-3700

Email: frank@ahooo.com

Landscape Architect: Urban Design Studio

Address: Palm Beach Lakes Boulevard,

West Palm Beach, FL 33409

Phone: 561-689-0066

Public Official: Kim Delaney, Planning Director,

City of Stuart

Address: City Hall, Stuart, FL 34994

Phone: 561-288-5306

Email: kdelaney@cityofstuart.com

Directions: Take the Stuart exit from I-95 and go northeast on State Road 76 to US 1. Go north on US 1 over the Roosevelt Bridge to SR 707 north, a right turn. Go to the traffic light, which is Savanna Road, and turn left into Avonlea.

A Guidebook to New Urbanism in Florida

Avalon Park

Location: Southeast Orange County, Florida

Status: Under construction

Summary: Avalon Park is 1,860 acres nestled in the serene, natural surroundings along the Econolockhatchee River. Planning includes 3,223 single-family units, 800 multi-family units and 500,000 square feet of commercial space, workplace, and civic sites.

History: The project was originally purchased and planned in the late 1980s. Because of its size, almost 10,000 acres, Orange County required that the development be planned and permitted as a Traditional Neighborhood Development. The project was dormant until the mid-1990s when the current developer, Beat Kahli, became involved. There were two large land transactions between Avalon, Orange County, and St. John’s River Water Management District. The two governmental entities acquired approximately 8,000 acres to create what is now named the Hal Scott Preserve. Avalon retained 1,860 acres, which is what is now being developed. The first models opened in July 1999 with two homebuilders; today there are 18 models and seven homebuilders. Currently, there are approximately 2,400 units permitted and under various stages of development. Residential build-out is assumed to take an additional 4 to 5 years. The Town Center will grow as rooftops and traffic increase, which puts an estimated time of completion in 2010. The first commercial building opened in 2000 and contains a dry cleaner, restaurant, and corporate offices. An 80,000 square-foot mixed-use building containing three stories of apartments over shops, 18,000 square foot medical office building, and townhomes are under construction. A church will begin construction in the summer of 2002.

Special Features: 240 acres of wetlands; 400 acres of upland preserve and 250 acres of lakes, neighborhood greens, and a future regional park, which will allow for ample recreational space; elementary and high schools, which are currently open; and a middle school (construction to begin in the near future)

Site Information: See project description.

Costs: Estimated at $1.2 billion

Financing: Conventional bank financing and a higher than typical equity position

Marketing: Avalon Park is marketed as a neo-traditional community located close to the East-West expressway in east Orlando with a wide variety of housing product, emerging retail, and commercial business opportunities, as well as two on-site public schools, a growing number of current and planned recreational amenities, and natural surroundings.

Developer: Beat Kahli, Avalon Associate of Delaware Limited Partnership

Address: 13001 Founders Square Drive, Orlando, FL 32828

Phone: 407-658-6565

Email: bkioff@aol.com

Architect: Ross Halle

Address: 13001 Founders Square Drive, Orlando, FL 32828

Phone: 407-658-6565

Email: rossh@avalonpark.com

Landscape Architect: John Ewseychik

Address: 620 Crown Oak Centre Drive, Orlando, FL 32750

Phone: 407-830-8922

Email: jelagolf@magicnet.net

Public Official: Paul Bergman

Address: 200 S. Rosalind St.

Phone: 407-836-5600

Directions: Take East-West Expressway (408) to Alafaya Trail and go south for 5 miles. Entry is on the right-hand side.

Baldwin Park

Location: Orlando, Florida

Status: Under construction, with sales beginning in June 2002

Summary: Baldwin Park will contain 3,500 residential units, including a mix of single-family homes, townhomes, apartments, and condominiums; 200,000 square feet of retail; civic sites; and 1,000,000 square feet of office space

History: Baldwin Park is a redevelopment of the Orlando Naval Training Center, closed as part of the Federal Base Closure and Realignment Act of 1990. The base was transferred to private developers via the City of Orlando in 1999. 4.5 million square feet of buildings had to be demolished prior to construction.

Special Features: 200 acres of parks, 250 acres of lakes, 54-acre mixed-use Village Center, and 3 active amenity parks.

Site Information: A 100-gross-acres and 776-developable-acre site located 3 miles from the center of downtown Orlando and adjacent to Winter Park, Florida

Costs: $100 million

Financing: Community Development District bond and conventional financing

Marketing: Baldwin Park is marketed as “neighborhood friendly, city smart,” using billboards, direct mail, Internet sales, some newspaper, and an on-site sales center.

Developer: Douglass Freedman, Baldwin Park Development Company

Address: 1099 Bennett Road, Orlando, FL 32803

Phone: 407-515-1577

Email: DFreedman@BaldwinParkFL.com

Architect: Miller Sellen Conner & Walsh and SOM

Miller Sellen Conner & Walsh

Address: 214 E. Lucerne Circle, Orlando, FL 32801

Phone: 407-422-3330

Email: Geoff.McNeill@mscwinc.com

Landscape Architect: Glatting Jackson

Address: 33 E. Pine Street, Orlando, FL 32801

Phone: 407-843-6552

Email: jruttman@glatting.com

Directions: I-4 eastbound, left on Bumby 408 East, right on Colonial Exit Bumby, left on Bennett.

Belmont Heights

Location: Tampa, Florida

Status: Under construction

Summary: The Revitalization Plan for the Ponce De Leon and College Hill Homes neighborhoods in Tampa will transform existing gated barracks-style public housing into a vibrant new mixed-income residential neighborhood consistent with Florida’s best traditional communities. The new master plan, generated through a series of town meetings, knits the new streets and houses into the surrounding traditional neighborhoods. The plan capitalizes on the sites greatest natural amenity, beautiful large Live Oaks and other species, by maintaining the tree-canopied streets, and by creating new parks and greens that save large stands of mature trees. These new greens organize and provide a sense of identity for the new community.

Single-family, duplex, and Grand House (four-plex) residences are designed in the Florida Craftsman style and community buildings are designed in the Spanish Colonial style indigenous to the area. All residences have front or side porches, as is customary in traditional Florida neighborhoods, and resemble the single-family house style of the surrounding area. There will be a mix of homeownership, market-rate rental, and subsidized rental units offered to persons at a variety of income levels. Four new community buildings, including a new educational facility equipped with computers and other digital equipment, will be available for the educational, social, and daily needs of residents.

Special Features: 74-acre site; 860 residential units; 3 community centers; 1 community center/education facility; and a mixed-income community

Costs: Total development cost of approximately $130 million

Financing: $35 million HOPE VI Grant, as well as Low Income Housing Tax Credits, Community Development Block Grant Funds, HOME Funds, and State Housing Finance Agency

Marketing: Belmont Heights is marketed to mixed-income renters and homebuyers.

Developer: Bob Grier and Gin Cohen,

Michaels Development

Address: One East Stow Road, Marlton, NJ 08053

Phone: 856-596-3008

Architect: Tom Gallas, Torti Gallas and Partners

Address: 1300 Spring Street, Silver Spring, MD 20910

Phone: 301-588-4800

Email: tgallas@tortigallaschk.com

Landscape Architect: Glatting Jackson Kercher Anglin Lopez Rinehart, Inc.

Address: 33 East Pine Street, Orlando, FL 32801

Phone: 407-843-6552

Email: jruttman@glatting.com

Public Official: Denise E. Suries,

Tampa Housing Authority

Address: 808 N. Rome Street, Tampa, FL 33606

Phone: 813-253-0551

Directions: From Tampa International Airport take I-275 to I-4 North. Take the 22nd Street exit off of I-4 heading north (left). Follow 22nd Street to 26th Ave. Construction site starts at the intersection of 22nd Street and 26th Ave.

Botanica/Sea Plum

Location: Jupiter, Florida

Status: Approved and permitted; development scheduled to begin May 2002

Summary: Botanica and Sea Plum are separate but interconnected developments. Botanica, developed by New Urban Jupiter Partners, contains 138 single-family homes, 134 townhomes, and 30 auxiliary dwelling units on 94 acres. Sea Plum, developed by Allstate Realty Partners, contains 256 condominium and townhome units and 54,000 square feet of commercial space on 47 acres. Botanica and Sea Plum together include over 80 acres of wetland and upland preserves and lakes. End-unit pricing is anticipated to range from $140,000 to $400,000.

History: The property was acquired in July 2000. It was last used and zoned for industrial use. The last two years have been spent securing the necessary property entitlements to construct the Botanica and Sea Plum Traditional Neighborhood Developments.

Special Features: Central greenway, upland preserves, wetland preserves, 3-mile bike path system, and interconnectivity provided to surrounding non-residential properties. All but 15 homes are alley-fed.

Site Information: Botanica and Sea Plum are located on the NE Corner of Indian Creek Parkway and Military Trail, Jupiter, Florida, on 143 total acres and include 526 total residential units, plus 30 auxiliary dwelling units, and 54,000 square feet of commercial space.

Costs: Botanica, $67 million; Sea Plum, $47 million

Financing: Ocean Bank, Miami, Florida

Marketing: Botanica and Sea Plum are positioned as moderately priced, more walkable and environmentally friendlier alternatives to the generally higher priced conventional suburban and golf-course communities in Northern Palm Beach County. Both are a continuation of the alternative urban form established at Abacoa, located directly to the southeast. Botanica is marketed by New Urban Jupiter Partners and Sea Plum is marketed by Allstate Realty Partners.

Developers (Botanica): Tim Hernandez and Kevin Rickard, New Urban Jupiter Partners, LLC

Address: 398 NE 6th Avenue, Delray Beach, FL 33483

Phone: 561-279-8706 x 201

Email: thernandez@newurbancommunities.com; krickard@newurbancommunities.com

Developers (Sea Plum): Richard Caster and Irving Miller, Allstate Realty Partners, LLC

Address: 2601 Biscayne Boulevard, Miami, FL 33137

Phone: 305-576-6333

Email: rfcaster@bellsouth.net; iemiller@millergp.com

Site Planner: Don Hearing, Cotleur-Hearing

Address: 1934 Commerce Lane, Suite 1, Jupiter, FL 33458

Phone: 561-747-6336 x 202

Email: don_hearing@cotleur-hearing.com

Landscape Architect: Don Hearing, Cotleur-Hearing

Address: 1934 Commerce Lane, Suite 1, Jupiter, FL 33458

Phone: 561-747-6336 x 202

Email: don_hearing@cotleur-hearing.com

Public Official: Stephanie Thoburn/John Sickler/Sam Shannon, Town of Jupiter

Address: 210 Military Trail, Jupiter, FL 33458

Phone: 561-746-5134 Email: stepha@jupiter.fl.us; sams@jupiter.fl.us; johns@jupiter.fl.us

Directions: I-95 to Indiantown Road. Go east on Indiantown Road to Military Trail, and then go south on Military Trail to Indian Creek Pkwy. to the site at the NE corner of Indian Creek Pkwy. and Military Trail.

Brytan

Location: Gainesville, Florida

Status: Under current county regulations, mixed-use developments are not permitted. The new comprehensive plan has language that might permit this development.

Summary: Brytan is a 150-acre parcel designed to incorporate commercial, office, residential and open/public spaces.

History: Brytan was master planned by Duany Plater-Zyberk & Company in the summer of 2000. The charrette was attended by a large cross-section of interested citizens, professionals, special interest groups, local organizations, municipal staff and elected officials, and the overall result was quite favorable. Since the charrette, the county has been re-writing its comprehensive plan.

Special Features: Ideally located on a major transportation route yet backs up to residential areas allowing for a nice development of the transect from urban to rural

Site Information: 150 acres (with a 10-acre out-parcel in the middle owned by another person who lives on the property)

Costs: Over $300,000 spent to date, prior to permitting stage. Total costs will not be known until the county regulations are established.

Financing: Bank and investor financing

Marketing: The developer owns a realty company which will do initial marketing.

Developer: David M. Miller, Brice Business Group

Address: 5517 SW 69th Terrace, Gainesville, FL 32608

Phone: 352-372-7736

Email: dmiller@bricegroup.com

Architect/Town Planner: Jorge Planes, Duany Plater-Zyberk & Company

Address: 1023 SW 25th Avenue, Miami, FL 33135

Phone: 305-644-1023

Email: jorge@dpz.com

Directions: I-75 to Gainesville. Exit at the Archer Road exit, Exit 75, and go west for 2 miles to the intersection of Archer Road and 75th Street (Tower Road). The property is on the south side of Archer Road.

Cagan Crossings

Location: Clermont, Florida

Status: Phase I complete; Phase II under construction; Town Center in final development with groundbreaking to take place by end of 2002

Summary: Zoned for 8,000 units and 500,000 square-feet of commercial space; to date, 994 units have been built; Town Center construction to commence by year-end

History: Duany Plater-Zyberk & Company prepared the master land-use plan.

Special Features: Town Center (under development) includes a regional library (under development), pools, fitness center, resident activity center, business center, executive putting green (under development); residences feature gourmet kitchens, high ceilings and ceramic floors, and high-speed Internet access.

Site Information: 650 acres

Costs: $50 million to date

Financing: Construction financing through Compass Bank; end loan through GMAC

Marketing: Cagan Crossings offers “Small Town Living with Big City Amenities.” The development has attracted many Disney cast members looking for an affordable home in a community environment close to work. Cagan Crossings offers a town that promotes a sense of community not usually experienced in today’s “big cities.”

Developer: Jeffrey Cagan, Cagan Management Group, Inc.

Address: 16554 Crossings Boulevard, Clermont, FL 34711

Phone: 352-242-2444 x222

Email: Jeff@cagan.com

Architect: Charlan-Brock & Associates

Address: 2600 Maitland Drive, Suite 260, Maitland, FL 32751

Phone: 407-660-8900

Email: david@cbarchtwcts.com

Landscape Architect: Joe Knight, Knight, Kincaid & Associates

Address: 545 N. Virginia Avenue, Winter Park, FL 32789

Phone: 407-647-2808

Email: mail@kincaid.com

Public Official: Sharon Farrell, Lake County Department of Growth Management

Address: 315 W. Main Street, Tavares, FL 32778

Phone 352-343-9642

Directions: Take highway 192 West to Highway 27 North. Cagan Crossings is on the left side about ¼ mile north on Highway 27. The community is located about 4 miles west of Disney.

Cape Coral Downtown

Location: Cape Coral, Florida

Status: The Community Redevelopment Agency, the Planning and Zoning Board, and the City Commission unanimously approved the new master plan for the Cape Coral Community Redevelopment Area, named DesignDowntown, in early 2002. Work on a new illustrative code for downtown is slated to begin in mid-2002.

Summary: The plan applies New Urbanism techniques to creating a more complete urban center amid a 1960s-style suburb. The charrette to design a plan for Downtown Cape Coral was held in late 2001.

History: In the 1960s the Rosen Brothers undertook an aggressive campaign to bring people to the Cape. Homesites were laid out along 400 miles of canals with many homes having direct access to the Gulf of Mexico or the Caloosahatchee River. Cape Coral is now one of Florida’s largest cities, although it is far from complete. Early advertisements described the housing, commercial, and civic activities that a future resident could expect to find. In early plans, downtown was shown with a grid of streets, varying block sizes, and parking lots, but no access to the waterfront. Forty years later, the need to provide additional businesses, stores, civic opportunities, and housing choices is still evident. Creating waterfront locations for dining and shopping is another important goal. Recently, momentum has been building to enhance the sense of community and civic mindedness that already exists in downtown.

Special Features: Working onsite in Cape Coral, the planning team and citizen participants formed a list of first principles: connectivity to water, walkability, taming through-traffic, being smart about parking, buildings relating to their streets, emphasizing evening and outdoor dining, shade and greenery, mixed uses, mixed incomes, better public gathering spaces, urban architecture, and business-friendly street details.

Site Information: Approximately 350 acres

Costs: Long-term development plan estimated at $900 million over 20 years

Financing: Combination of conventional private financing and tax-increment financing for public-private partnerships through the Cape Coral Redevelopment Agency

Marketing: Project marketed as a mixed-use downtown “urban village” in a waterfront setting, including the full range of retail, entertainment, employment, lodging, varied housing, and services

Public Official: Chet Hunt, Executive Director, Cape Coral Redevelopment Agency

Address: 1314 Cape Coral Parkway East, Cape Coral, FL 33904-9643

Phone: 941-549-5615

Email:chunt@coconet.com

Town Planner / Urban Designer: Dover, Kohl & Partners

Address: 5879 Sunset Drive, Suite 1, South Miami, FL 33143

Phone: 305-666-0446 Email: info@doverkohl.com

Directions: Take I-75 to Exit 20, turn west on Alico Road, and bear right (north-west) onto US-41 [State Road-45] 5 miles. Turn left (west) onto College Pkwy. (South Tamiami Trail) 0.4 miles. Continue west on College Pkwy. 2 miles and then continue west on Cape Coral Bridge Road to Downtown Cape Coral.

Celebration

Location: Northwest Osceola County, Florida

Status: Under construction

Summary: Celebration combines architecture, education, health, and technology in ways that promote a strong sense of community. Founded in 1994, Celebration is home to more than 5,000 residents in 1,300 homes, a public school, an 18-hole public golf course, a comprehensive health campus, a private university center, park and recreation areas, and a Town Center featuring a variety of shops and restaurants.

History: Located adjacent to Walt Disney World Resort, Celebration is situated on 4,900 acres and is surrounded by a 4,700-acre wetland buffer. Conceived as a small southeastern town with pre-1940s architecture, Celebration is being developed by The Celebration Company, a wholly owned subsidiary of The Walt Disney Company. When complete, the community is anticipated to have approximately 12,000 residents.

Special Features: One of the strongest statements about the planners’ commitment to building a strong sense of community was development of a non-profit community foundation to provide guidance and resources in building the “soft” infrastructure of the project. This organization, along with the Town Hall homeowners’ association, provides citizens the opportunity for involvement in the community as it evolves and grows. Since Celebration’s inception 8 years ago, nearly two dozen civic, service, and religious organizations have been established. More than 70% of the residents report volunteering for a charitable cause, and more than 80% know someone in the community that they could depend on.

Site Information: Designed in harmony with the land, the community is an archipelago of villages within wetland and habitat preserves. With a completed Town Center and 2,600 residential units, the mixed-use community integrates residential, commercial, educational institutions, shops, dining, and services through a network of paths, trails, and boardwalks.

Financing: Internal resources and public infrastructure bonds (through a development district)

Marketing: Celebration residential is positioned as a one-of-a-kind masterpiece, built with much thought and care. Celebration was founded on the principle that home should extend beyond the boundaries of individual property to include the neighborhood as part of what residents call home.

Developer: The Celebration Company

Address: 610 Sycamore Street, Suite 310, Celebration, FL 34747

Phone: 407-566-2200

Email: celebration.company@celebration.fl.us

Architect: Robert A.M. Stern Architects

Address: 460 West 34th Street, New York, NY 10001

Phone: 212-967-5100

Cooper, Robertson & Partners

Address 311 West 43rd Street, New York, NY 10036

Phone: 212-247-1717

Landscape Architect: EDAW

Address: 601 Prince Street, Alexandria, VA 22314

Phone: 703-836-1414

Directions: South of US 192 and adjacent to Interstate 4, Celebration is 30 minutes from Downtown Orlando and 20 minutes from the Orlando International Airport via the

GreeneWay. Follow Interstate 4 to exit 25A, turn right at the second light onto Celebration Ave., and follow it to Town Center.

Citrus Park Village

Location: Northwest Hillsborough County, Florida

Status: Draft zoning plan and design regulations, anticipated rezoning and comprehensive plan amendment anticipated in January 2003.

Summary: Citrus Park Village is an historic community with existing elementary and high schools and a street grid that was platted in 1902.

History: In 1998, the Hillsborough County Board of County Commissioners initiated an ambitious community-planning program that committed to give residents more input in the decision-making process. The Northwest Hillsborough Community Plan encourages development of compact, mixed-use, traditional neighborhoods that protect natural ecosystems and produce fully serviced community areas. The Citrus Park Village Neighborhood Plan implements the vision and principles of the Northwest Hillsborough Community Plan. The Citrus Park Plan was developed as a result of public comments, surveys, citizens’ ideas from workshops, and steering committee meetings. The master plan will serve as a template for future growth in the village. Traditional Neighborhood Development design regulations and zoning for Citrus Park Village will be presented to the Board of County Commissioners in late spring 2002.

Special Features: Features include a neighborhood elementary and high school. The adjacent Veterans Expressway allows convenient access to the region and links the community to downtown Tampa. The Upper Tampa Bay Trail is a 16-mile paved multi-use trail project that runs through the heart of Citrus Park.

Site Information: An approximately 800-acre site

Architect: Steve Luce, URS

Address: 7650 W. Courtney Campbell Causeway, Tampa, FL 33607

Phone: 813-286-1711

Email: steve_luce@URScorp.com

Landscape Architect: Brian Canin, Canin Assoc.

Address: 500 Delaney Avenue, Orlando, FL 32801

Phone: 407-422-4040

Email: bcanin@canin.com

Public Official: Lisa Kramer

Address: 601 E. Kennedy Boulevard, 20th Floor, Tampa, FL 33602

Phone: 813-276-8392

Email: kramerl@HillsboroughCounty.org

Directions: Exit east from the Tampa International Airport onto I-275 North and merge into Veterans Expy. Take exit 9 off of the Veteran’s Expy., turn left onto Gunn Hwy. to Ehrlich Road, and turn left onto Ehrlich Road.

CityPlace

Location: West Palm Beach, Florida

Status: Phase I completed and opened October 2000; additional phases in development

Summary: CityPlace represents a new concept of entertainment-retail. The high-density project, modeled after an Italian city, mixes 78 national retailers, local and regional specialty shops, 10 destination restaurants, close to 600 residences, a restored 1920s church that serves as a multi-purpose cultural center, a 20-screen cinema complex, a 23,000 square-foot grocery store, plus a $3.5-million show fountain. A $45-million, 15-story condominium building containing 300 units and a six-story parking garage is planned to begin construction in fall 2002. The project will be next to a proposed 375-room hotel and 330,000-square-foot Palm Beach County Convention Center scheduled to open in fall 2003.

History: In 1986, Henry Rolfs and David Paladino acquired 340 parcels of land in nine months. Rolf’s goal was to build a spectacular gateway to the island of Palm Beach. The plan collapsed with the real estate depression of the late 1980s. West Palm Beach Mayor Nancy Graham is credited with turning the failed project into an opportunity for the city. Her vision was to fill the razed acreage with retail, offices, market-rate housing, cultural facilities, and public spaces. After a nationwide Request for Proposals in 1996, the city selected the coalition now known as CityPlace Partners. Four years later, the city celebrated the grand opening.

Special Features: 600,000 square feet of retail, including more than 75 specialty stores; 10 destination restaurants; restored 1920s venue for concerts, exhibits and community events; $3.5 million show fountain; free parking for 3,300 vehicles in four garages; and valet parking.

Site Information: Site is at the intersection of I-95 and Okeechobee Boulevard, 10 minutes from Palm Beach International Airport, with free trolley service to and from the Clematis Street District.

Costs: Completed CityPlace project estimated at $700 million

Financing/Owners: CityPlace Retail, LLC, New York (comprised of): The Related Companies, L.P., New York, The Palladium Company, New York, The O’Connor Group, New York, The Related Group of Florida, and State Teachers Retirement System of Ohio.

Marketing: CityPlace focuses on its role as a daily shopping destination, not a special occasion destination, enhanced by the addition of a supermarket. By the fall of 2002, several family-friendly dining options will open, accommodating a wider range of tastes and preference. The development is the focal point of West Palm Beach, providing the city’s highest concentration of stores, restaurants, and entertainment options in one location.

Developer: Ken Himmel, CEO, The Palladium Company

Address: 625 Madison Avenue, New York, NY 10022-1801

Phone: 212-421-5333

Design Architect: Elkus/Manfredi Architects Ltd.

Address: 530 Atlantic Avenue, Boston, MA 02210

Phone: 617-426-1300

Architect-of-Record: Wolfberg Alvarez

Address: 1500 San Remo Avenue, Suite 300, Coral Gables, FL 33416

Phone: 305-666-5474

Architect for the Harriet Himmel Gilman Theater: REG Architects

Address: 120 S. Dixie Highway, West Palm Beach, FL 33401

Phone: 561-659-2383

Residential architect: Roger Fry

Address: 2791 Bird Avenue, Coconut Grove, FL 33133

Phone: 305-446-7787

Landscape Architect: Bradshaw Gill & Associates

Address: 4337 Sea Grape Drive, Lauderdale by the Sea, FL 33308

Phone: 305-944-7245

Directions: CityPlace is located on Okeechobee Blvd., just east of I-95 accessed by exit 52.

Courtyards of Delray

Location: Delray Beach, Florida

Status: Under construction; Project completion anticipated May 2002

Summary: Courtyards of Delray contains 32 three-story townhomes on 1.06 acres. Prices range from about $250,000 to $400,000.

History: The property, formerly a drive-through bank, was acquired in January 2000. Some homes were converted into offices for redevelopment of the immediate neighborhood. The community sold out in about 18 months.

Special Features: Pool, courtyard, and balconies; good residential solution to high traffic location; specimen tree relocation; and pioneering example of residential New Urbanism in Downtown Delray Beach.

Site Information: 32 homes on 1.06 acres located one-half block south of East Atlantic Avenue between NE 5th and NE 6th Avenues in Delray.

Costs: $10 million

Financing: GMAC Mortgage, Horsham, Pennsylvania

Marketing: New Urban Communities marketed Courtyards of Delray to professionals, local business owners, and out-of-state second homebuyers who want new construction in a downtown setting.

Developer: Tim Hernandez and Kevin Rickard, New Urban Communities

Address: 398 NE 6th Avenue, Delray Beach, FL 33483

Phone: 561-279-8706 x 201

Email: thernandez@newurbancommunities.com; krickard@newurbancommunities.com

Site Planner/Architect: Erick Valle, Jaime Correa, and Estela Valle, Correa Valle Valle

Address: 194 Minorca, Coral Gables, FL 33134

Phone: 561-747-6336 x 202

Email: evalle@urbanism.com

Architect: Scott Disher, Sean Naeger, and Scott Blakeslee, Disher Architects

Address: 2400 High Ridge Road, Suite 100,

Boynton Beach, FL 33426

Phone: 561-733-8800 x 219

Email: snaeger@sbdassociates.com; sdisher@sbdassociates.com

Landscape Architect: Brad Swanzy, Land Design South

Address: 1280 N. Congress Avenue, Suite 215, West Palm Beach, FL 33409

Phone: 561-478-8501

Email: bswanzy@landdesignsouth.com

Public Official: Paul Dorling and Jeff Costello, City of Delray Beach

Address: 100 NW 1st Avenue, Delray Beach, FL 33444

Phone: 561-243-7041

Email: jcostello@delrayplanning.org; pdorling@delrayplanning.org

Directions: I-95 to Atlantic Ave. East on Atlantic Ave. to SE 5th Ave. (US 1). South ½ block on SE 5th Ave. to site, located on east side of SE 5th Ave.

Eagle Creek Village Center

Location: Southeast Orange County, Florida

Status: Development of Regional Impact (DRI) and Planned Unit Development zoning approvals obtained and now seeking construction permits

Summary: Eagle Creek Village Center is located southeast of Orlando International Airport in an area projected to become a regionally significant employment center. The Village Center is located in the heart of a new town planned in Southeast Orange County. The cornerstones for the Village Center are education, community, and livability. It will include two distinct neighborhoods with a variety of residential types and sizes, a public school, community park, community center, shopping, and workplaces. The diversity of uses will bring together people of all ages and backgrounds.

History: The Eagle Creek DRI was approved by Orange County in 2001. Located between the rapidly developing airport employment area and an established rural settlement, the planning, review, and approval process for Eagle Creek required open and regular communication with numerous interest groups, especially the residents of the rural settlement. The plan for the community was also shaped by the existence of a major natural area and ecological mitigation sites nearby.

Special Features: The Village Center contains a main street commercial/office area with approvals to put residential units above the shops and offices. Townhomes, apartments, and condominium units are all planned. The public school, community park, and community center are within easy walking or biking distance of all residences.

Site Information: 146 gross acres, 550 multifamily units, 299 single family units, 50,000 square feet of office, 150,000 square feet of retail, and 35 acres school and community park

Finance: Private investors

Marketing: Target families with children, empty nesters, professional singles, and couples

Developer: Joe Pasqualetti, Emerson Creek Development Corporation

370 Center Pointe Circle, Suite 1136, Altamonte Springs, FL 32701

Phone: 407-834-9560

Planner: Glatting Jackson Kercher Anglin Lopez Rinehart, Inc.

Address: 33 East Pine Street, Orlando, FL 32801

Phone: 407-843-6552

Email: jrutmann@glatting.com

Public Official: Commissioner Clarence Hoenstine

Address: 201 South Rosalind Avenue, 5th Floor,

Orlando, FL 32801

Phone: 407-836-7350

Email: district4@ocfl.net

Directions: From Downtown Orlando, go east on the East West Expy. (408). Go south on the Greeneway (417). Exit on Narcoossee Road and go south to Tyson Road. The project site is along the west side of Narcoossee Road south of Tyson Road to Clapp Simms Duda Road.

East Village

Location: Fort Lauderdale, Florida

Status: Permitted; construction to begin June 2002

Summary: East Village contains 32 courtyard homes on 0.88 acres. Prices range from about $190,000 to $240,000.

History: The property is excess land owned by the First Evangelical Lutheran Church. The community was 50% sold out in less than a month after a sign was placed on the property.

Special Features: East Village provides a pool, cabana, and alley fed homes, and is an example of high-density, fee-simple housing on the fringe of downtown Fort Lauderdale. The property is located within a Community Redevelopment Area.

Site Information: East Village is on the southeast corner of Northeast 2nd Avenue and Northeast 5th Street in Fort Lauderdale.

Costs: $6.5 million

Financing: SunTrust Bank, Fort Lauderdale

Marketing: East Village is targeted to young couples and singles who want new construction in East Fort Lauderdale within walking distance of downtown in the low $200,000 range. The development is marketed by New Urban Communities.

Developer: Tim Hernandez and Kevin Rickard, New Urban Lyman, LLC

Address: 398 NE 6th Avenue, Delray Beach, FL 33483

Phone: 561-279-8706 x 201

Email: thernandez@newurbancommunities.com; krickard@newurbancommunities.com

Site Planner: Peter Aquart, Miller Legg Associates

Address: 1300 Corporate Center Way

Wellington, FL 33414

Phone: 561-798-9981 x 23

Email: paquart@millerlegg.com

Architect: Scott Disher, Sean Naeger, Scott Blakeslee Disher Architects

Address: 2400 High Ridge Road, Suite 100, Boynton Beach, FL 33426

Phone: 561-733-8800 x 219

Email: snaeger@sbdassociates.com; sdisher@sbdassociates.com

Landscape Architect: Bill Dumond, Land Design South

Address: 1280 N. Congress Avenue, Suite 215, West Palm Beach, FL 33409

Phone: 561-478-8501

Email: wdumond@landdesignsouth.com

Public Official: Kim Jackson, Executive Director, Northwest-Progresso-Flagler Heights Community Redevelopment Authority

Address: 101 NE 3rd Avenue, Suite 300, Fort Lauderdale, FL 33301

Phone: 954-828-8952 Email: kimj@ci.fort-lauderdale.fl.us

Directions: I-95 to Broward Blvd. East on Broward Blvd. to NE 3rd Ave. North on NE 3rd Ave. to NE 4th Street. West on NE 4th Street to NE 2nd Avenue. North on NE 2nd Ave. to site, at the SE corner of NE 2nd Ave. and NE 5th Street.

Fort Pierce Waterfront

Location: Fort Pierce, Florida

Status: More than 20 private and public projects have been completed since the Fort Pierce charrettes, including a roundabout in the downtown, the reconstruction of Avenue D and Delaware Avenue, and a new public library on the waterfront. The City of Fort Pierce also built a new police station and prepared plans for a new Marina Pavilion, both designed by Chael, Cooper & Associates.

Summary: Along with Treasure Coast Regional Planning Council and the Fort Pierce Planning Department, Dover, Kohl & Partners helped facilitate a series of charrettes and designed the plan, which included: establishing a pattern for growth along the water’s edge; extending the downtown to meet its waterfront on Indian River Lagoon; designing a streetscape scheme for the main street; proposing to preserve the historic theater; developing a promotional “positioning” strategy; selecting sites and architectural approach for a new federal courthouse, library, police station and other civic buildings; planning for growth in the city’s deepwater port and related maritime activities; and providing for revitalization, preservation, and infill development of numerous neighborhoods in the inner city extending back from the waterfront.

History: The first charrette in 1995 proactively designed the next evolution of the town’s character and economy. The success of this charrette spawned two more charrettes for residential neighborhoods and a fourth charrette focusing on the Port of Fort Pierce.

Special Features: The revitalization of Fort Pierce’s waterfront combines a mix of needs from industry to tourism to residential life, all key to the future success of the ever-changing city.

Site Information: Key elements of the plan include: entry to the waterfront neighborhood revitalized industrial area, “International Sailing Village,” public views to the water Marina Pavilion, restored natural habitat, and preservation of the architectural character of the working waterfront.

Costs: Long-term redevelopment plan, estimated at $250 million over 20 years

Financing: Combination of conventional private financing and bond-financed public-private partnerships

Marketing: Project is marketed as a mixed-use downtown in a water-front setting, including the full range of entertainment, employment, civic uses, and varied housing and services, with anticipation of a commuter rail transit station.

Public Official: Ramon Trias, Planning Director, City of Fort Pierce

Address: 100 N. US 1, Fort Pierce, FL 34950

Phone: 561-460-2200 ext. 200

Email: ramontrias@aol.com

Town Planner/Urban Designer: Dover, Kohl & Partners (with Ramon Trias and Treasure Coast Regional Planning Council)

Address: 5879 Sunset Drive, Suite 1, South Miami, FL 33143

Phone: 305-666-0446 Email: info@doverkohl.com

Architect: Chael, Cooper & Associates

Address: 5879 Sunset Drive, Suite 1, South Miami, FL 33143

Phone: 305-666-0185

Email: mchael@chaelcooper.com

Landscape Architect: Thomas Lucido & Associates

Address: 100 Avenue A, Ste. 2A, Fort Pierce, FL 34950

Phone: 561-467-1301

Directions: From I-95 North take Florida’s Turnpike North. Take Exit 16 (on the left towards State Road 826 West). Merge onto Florida’s Turnpike North and then take the State Road-70 exit, Exit 152, toward Ft. Pierce/Vero Beach. Turn right onto Florida 70 East, followed by a slight turn left, and then a slight turn right onto Okeechobee Road. Okeechobee Road becomes Delaware Ave. Turn left onto South 13th Street, turn right onto Orange Ave., and make a sharp right onto US 1/Florida-5.

Haile Village Center

Location: Alachua County, Florida

Status: Under construction since the early 1990s, all development work is now complete and the village center will be built-out over the next few years. 110,000 square feet of office and retail space are currently occupied.

Summary: Haile Village Center was designed to provide for the daily needs of those living within a community with a wide range of housing from rental apartments and townhouses through large estates. Medical and dental offices, law practices, and other professional offices are located in the Village Center for the convenience of residents, as well as business owners. Many of the buildings have rental apartments above the commercial space and business owners and tenants have formed a merchants association that sponsors community events. When complete, Haile Village Center will contain 160,000 square feet of office and retail space with over 800 parking spaces, in addition to the on-street parallel parking provided on the residential streets.

History: Haile Village Center was planned as part of the overall Haile Plantation during the late 1970s. The two primary objectives were to provide a complete community in which people can work, shop, worship, attend school, and enjoy outdoor recreation and leisure time activities within walking distance or a short drive from their homes, and to develop a high-quality man-made environment while preserving, maintaining, and enhancing the natural beauty of the land.

Special Features: A central community meeting place for residents; homes permitted to have garage apartments and home occupations, including bed and breakfast inns if owner-operated; and open space in close proximity to residents, including a park, tot-lot, square, plaza, close, and neighborhood green along with a golf course to create access to a 15-mile trail system

Site Information: Haile Village Center is a 50-acre mixed-use urban center on a site within a 1700-acre community known as Haile Plantation about 4 miles from the city limits of Gainesville.

Costs: Total value will be approximately $75 million

Financing: Primarily individuals, commercial real estate loans for each building, conventional residential mortgages for homes; multifamily/mixed-use financing provided by institutional lenders

Marketing: Haile Village Center has been marketed on-site by Coldwell Banker and Haile Reality, Inc., an in-house part of the Haile Plantation Corporation. Marketing emphasis is on living, working, shopping, and playing within walking distance. Nearly all of the developer’s sales activity is complete and the focus has changed from leasing to property management.

Developer: Haile Plantation Corporation

Address: 5201 SW 91st Drive, Suite A

Gainesville, FL 32608

Phone: 352-335-7766

Email: bob@hailevillagecenter.com

Town Planner: Robert B. Kramer AIA and Matthew Kaskel

Address: 5201 SW 91st Drive, Suite A,

Gainesville, FL 32608

Phone: 352-335-7766

Email: bob@hailevillagecenter.com

Directions: From Interstate 75 take Exit 75 (State Road 24, Archer Road). Turn west onto State Road 24, go west to SW 75th Street (traffic signal) and make a right turn. Go north about 1 mile to SW 46th Blvd. (Haile Blvd.) traffic signal, turn left into Haile Plantation and go west to the 4-way stop sign (about 1.25 miles). Go straight after stop sign to the first right turn, which is SW 91st Terrace (the main street within Haile Village Center).

Hialeah Downtown

Location: City of Hialeah, Florida

Status: Under construction

Summary: A redevelopment project for the downtown area of the City of Hialeah

History: Correa Valle Valle worked under the direct supervision of Mayor Raul Martinez and General City Attorney William Grodnick. A series of meetings with staff, developers, and residents resulted in a master plan and a new zoning code for the downtown area. The master plan and zoning code were passed in less than two months. Work started two months after it was approved; today it has successfully sparked the interest of developers, thus revitalizing the downtown area.

Special Features: Definition of neighborhoods, wards, and districts. Special attention paid to building footprints, urban types, and their correlation to parking requirements. The plan suggests opportunities for various plazas and greens. A detailed landscape plan defines a thematic approach to streets, avenues, and public spaces.

Site Information: Downtown area and its surroundings

Costs: $15 million

Financing: Community Development Block Grants, city bonds, private funds

Marketing: For more than 10 years, no building permits were issued in the downtown. After the adoption of the Downtown Master Plan, the city has seen more than 3,000 market rate residential units (including single-family units, live/work units, and apartments) built. Public-private partnerships are forming.

Developer: William Grodnick, the City of Hialeah

Address: Hialeah City Hall, Hialeah, FL

Phone: 305-883-8012

Architect: Jaime Correa, Correa Valle Valle and Partners

Address: 194 Minorca Avenue, Coral Gables, FL 33134

Phone: 305-476-9212

Email: jcorrea@urbanism.com

Landscape Architect: Gary Greenan

Address: 1221 Dickinson Drive, Coral Gables, FL 33146

Phone: 305-284-3438

Public Official: Ted Boldiga, AICP, Director of Planning and Zoning, City of Hialeah

Address: City Hall, Hialeah, FL

Phone: 305-883-8012

Directions: Take State Road 836 west to the Miami Airport. Exit north on LeJeune Road. Continue on LeJeune to West Okeechobee Blvd. to Palm Ave. Okeechobee Blvd. borders the Miami River all the way to the Florida Everglades.

Jordan Commons

Location: Princeton, Florida

Status: 100 of 187 houses completed; community building to be completed by October 2002

Summary: Jordan Commons is a 187-home development located in South Miami-Dade County and is one of the largest Habitat for Humanity projects in the world. Homes are sold to low-income families at cost and at below-market rates (0% interest financing). Additionally, homes are made affordable with the cooling effect of concrete streets, landscaping, reflective roofs, and energy-efficient appliances. Initial plans call for a gymnasium, day-care center, and family resource center.

History: The project was conceived during the months following the 1992 Hurricane Andrew that devastated the area; thousands of families were displaced and housing stock destroyed. The resulting housing shortage spurred many community leaders to look for tangible responses to the problem. One of these responses was the New South Dade Charrette, a joint initiative of faculty at the University of Miami and Florida Atlantic University. The charrette produced a series of protoypical plans, one of which evolved into the plan for Jordan Commons.

Special Features: Concrete streets, houses clustered around common areas, native drought-resistant landscaping, and energy-efficient houses

Site Information: 40-acre development just east of the county’s main north-south artery, US 1 in a primarily an agricultural community.

Costs: No house in Jordan Commons sells for more than $60,000; approximately 100 houses built to date

Financing: The county provided the funds to purchase the land and build streets, sidewalks, water and sewer lines for the entire development. House construction is funded by contributions from the private sector.

Marketing: Jordan Commons is marketed to low-income families. Marketing techniques include outreach to church groups, community groups, and businesses frequented by the target population.

Developer: Habitat for Humanity of Greater Miami

Address: 9350 South Dadeland Boulevard, Suite 200, Miami, FL 33156

Phone: 305-670-2224

Email: hab4hum@bellsouth.net

Architect: Paul Buckler, Buckler Architects (current architect)

Address: 100 Madeira Avenue, Coral Gables, FL 33134

Phone: 305-442-8410

Landscape Architect: Michael DeGuidicce, Wallace, Roberts, & Todd

Address: 191 Giralda Avenue, Coral Gables, FL 33134

Phone: 305-448-0788

Public Official: Lee Rawlinson, Assistant Director, Miami-Dade County Department of Planning and Zoning

Address: 111 NW 1st Street, Suite 11-310, Miami, FL 33128

Phone: 305-375-2557

Email: leer@miamidade.gov

Directions: From the North take the Florida Turnpike to SW 112 Ave. (northbound exit), the first exit after the tollbooth in Cutler Ridge. Proceed north on 112 Ave. to SW 248 Street and to SW 129 Ave. and turn right. Jordan Commons will be a couple of blocks on the left.

Kendall Downtown

Location: Kendall, Florida

Status: Master Plan approved by the Miami-Dade Board of County Commissioners in 1998 following a charrette. The code was presented for approval and adopted in December of 1999 and updated in 2001. At present, more than 300 hotel rooms, 2,000 residential units, and 500,000 square feet of commercial space are undergoing government review for permits. Miami-Dade County has commissioned a detailed plan for all the new streets to be constructed in the part of Downtown Kendall south of Kendall Drive.

Summary: The Master Plan and Overlay Code for Downtown Kendall are the product of a June 1998 charrette dealing with a high-density urban center in Miami-Dade County. The planning area contains transportation corridors and intersections of four heavily traveled, regional roadways that crisscross a high intensity of retail, office, hotels, and nearby residential neighborhoods. The planning area has experienced remarkably fast growth, but poor pedestrian accessibility and visual blight are prominent in Downtown Kendall. The objective was to establish order among the physical chaos, facilitating development in a sustainable pattern and creating a lasting identity for the area.

History: 30 years ago Kendall Drive was a narrow country road and Dadeland Mall’s first buildings were sprouting at the rural edge of a young metropolis. Today this location is embedded in the suburban growth that followed closer to Downtown Miami and the coastal edge than to the western or southern reaches of metropolitan development. The region’s recent commitment of re-directing growth away from rural areas and back to the transportation corridors of the earliest settlements is slowly taking form with the first of its New Urbanist projects. The Downtown Kendall plan is a response to this vision. Mixed-use buildings will front a network of interconnected streets, parking garages will be placed mid-block to replace the vast expanses of surface parking, and transit is being re-integrated into the area.

Special Features: The plan is designed to accommodate change over time. The master plan includes a variety of mixed-use buildings and roadway improvements intended to create a pedestrian-friendly, thriving downtown in the heart of sprawl. The Downtown Kendall Plan addresses the high-rise building scale of metropolitan centers.

Site Information: The 250-acre area has long been poised for high-intensity development. Since it opened in the 1960s

Dadeland Mall has gradually become a regional and international destination. Kendall Drive swelled from a small dirt road to a major corridor. There are two Miami-Dade Transit Authority Metrorail stations within Downtown Kendall.

Cost: Long-term redevelopment plan, estimated at $5 billion over 30 years

Financing: Conventional private financing

Marketing: The Downtown Kendall Plan area is marketed as a transit-oriented, mixed-use development, forming a new metropolitan core around two Metrorail stations.

Public Official: Lee Rawlinson, Assistant Director, Miami-Dade County Department of Planning and Zoning

Address: 111 NW 1st Street, Suite 11-310

Miami, FL 33128

Phone: 305-375-2557

Email: leer@miamidade.gov

Traffic Engineer: Rick Hall, PE, Hall Planning & Engineering, Inc.

Address: 1237 North Adams Street,

Tallahassee, FL 32303

Phone: 850-222-2277

Email: rickhall@hpe-inc.com

Town Planners/Urban Designers: Dover, Kohl & Partners and Duany Plater-Zyberk & Company

Address: 5879 Sunset Drive, Suite 1

South Miami, FL 33143

Phone: 305-666-0446 Email: info@doverkohl.com

Directions: I-95 from downtown Miami and travel south on US 1. Take a right on Kendall Drive.

Lake Burden and Lake Sawyer Neighborhoods

Location: Southwest Orange County, Florida

Status: Permitted and under construction

Summary: Horizon West is a vision plan that Orange County created in 1995 to turn 66,000 acres of old orange groves into a New Town that embraces the elements found in traditional American towns planned during the pre-World War II era. Lakeside Village is the first planned village in Horizons West and comprises four distinct neighborhoods: Lake Sawyer, Lake Burden, Lake Reams, and Lake Spar. The concept promotes an integrated village pattern consisting of neighborhoods, schools, parks, and neighborhood commercial districts. The fundamental elements of each neighborhood are the elementary school and neighborhood park, where people can walk to community events, and children can walk or bike to recreational and educational activities. The county recognized that higher density development is necessary to achieve principles of New Urbanism and therefore created housing districts with minimum and maximum densities associated with each district.

History: Visioning and planning began in 1999. The Lake Sawyer Neighborhood Planned Development was approved in June 2000. Model homes opened in 2002. The Lake Burden Neighborhood Planned Development was approved in January 2001. Construction has not started in this neighborhood.

Special Features: Each neighborhood contains a 15-acre elementary school and 5-acre neighborhood park. In addition to the neighborhood parks, 7.5% of the upland area has been allocated for public parks and open space. Plus, a natural system of lakes and wetlands are preserved onsite. A pedestrian and bicycle network is provided not only to facilitate connectivity within each neighborhood, but also to connect all neighborhoods to the Village Center. Architectural and community design guidelines have been prepared to illustrate the concepts of New Urbanism. For example, streets will be narrower than typical street sections in the county, most homes will be accessed from a rear alley, and the multifamily buildings will be designed on a block structure that contributes to the pedestrian-friendly environment.

Site Information: The Lake Sawyer Neighborhood encompasses 757 gross acres including 323 acres of lakes, wetlands, open space and 1,614 dwelling units. Lake Burden encompasses 287 gross acres including 38 acres of lakes, wetlands, open space, and 1,226 units. Both neighborhoods will have elementary schools, 5-acre parks, and 2-acre commerical districts.

Costs: $61 million including land purchase

Financing: Private investors

Marketing: Target families with children and singles

Developer: Black Amber Developments, Inc.

Address: 108 S. Court Avenue, Orlando, FL 32801

Phone: 407-649-9988

Planner: Glatting Jackson Kercher Anglin Lopez Rinehart, Inc.

Address: 33 East Pine Street, Orlando, FL 32801

Phone: 407-843-6552

Email: jrutmann@glatting.com

Landscape Architect: Foster Conant & Associates

Address: 120 West Robinson Street, Orlando, FL 32801

Phone: 407-648-2225

Public Official: Commissioner Teresa Jacobs

Address: 201 S. Rosalind Avenue, 5th Floor, Orlando, FL 32801

Phone: 407-836-7350

Email: district1@ocfl.net

Directions: From downtown Orlando, go west on I-4 to Exit 31A-Conroy Road. Go west on Conroy 6 miles to Main Street and turn left. Follow Main Street to Chase Road and turn right. Follow Chase Road to the main entrance located at the intersection of CR 535 and Chase Road.

From Tampa, go east on I-4 to Exit 31A-Conroy Road. Go west on Conroy 6 miles to Main Street and turn left. Follow Main Street to Chase Road and turn right. Follow Chase Road to the main entrance located at the intersection of CR 535 and Chase Road.

Longleaf

Location: New Port Richey, Florida

Status: Under construction; partially completed

Summary: A 570-acre site with 1,450 dwelling units, 4 neighborhoods, mixed-use neighborhood centers, live-work, workplace, preschool, elementary school, church, town hall, swimming pools, extensive greenbelts, village greens, 3+ mile hike/bike trail, tennis, basketball, volleyball, and a playing field. Housing types include: townhomes, single-family homes, and country lots. There are 3 builders selling homes in various sizes and target markets. Homes range from 1,300 square feet to over 3,000 square feet in neighborhoods, and up to 5,000 in country lots. Prices range from the $140,000s to over $700,000.

History: Trey and Frank Starkey, whose family has owned the land for 65 years, are developing Longleaf. Design began in 1997, construction in 1999, and the first residents came in October 2000. As of summer 2002, approximately 100 homes are occupied; the preschool, town hall, pool, playground, ball courts, and postal kiosk are completed. The first mixed-use building is to be constructed soon.

Special Features: Longleaf is a market-rate primary-home community 30 minutes from both Tampa and Clearwater. Design Code requirements include substantial porches, elevated floors, privacy side manners, alley-loaded garages, and native landscaping. The development includes interconnected patterns of tree-lined streets featuring rhythms of spaces and views, and effective traffic calming. Substantial greenbelts and numerous village greens and recreational amenities are well used by residents. An environmental program is used to rehydrate and restore wetlands and to preserve upland habitat. The site uses reclaimed water irrigation and has natural gas and underground utilities.

Site Information: Longleaf is part of the Starkey family’s formerly 16,000-acre cattle ranch, nearly 13,000 acres of which the family has sold to the state for preservation. Suburban expansion of the Tampa Bay area has leap-frogged past this site, making Longleaf both a greenfield and an infill project. The site includes approximately 25% wetlands, 25% upland woodlands, and 50% pasture. Neighborhoods are concentrated in pasture areas; ½ – 3+ acre country lots are located in woodland areas with restricted clearing. Three or four man-made lakes will provide on-site fill. Adjacent land is typical suburban subdivision and remaining ranch land.

Costs: $40 million

Financing: Community Development District bond financing for primary infrastructure; bank financing for remaining soft costs

Marketing: Longleaf is marketed as “A Farm to Call Home.” Marketing promotes the neighborliness that is fostered by a traditional neighborhood design, and presents neighborhoods as an improved quality of life demonstrating how design features make this happen. Marketing tools include newspaper advertising, billboards, frequent local media coverage, and a full-time realtor liaison. An onsite Welcome Center is staffed by the developer and the model homes are staffed by builders.

Developer: Frank and Trey Starkey, Longleaf Development Company

Address: 12959 State Road 54, Odessa, FL 33556

Phone: 813-926-0499

Email: fstarkey@longleaftown.com

Website: www.longleaftown.com

Architect: Geoffrey Ferrell Associates

Address: 19 14th Street SE, Washington DC 20003

Phone: 202-547-7757

Email: geoffferrell@starpower.net

Landscape Architect: Suzanne Askew Landscape Design

Address: 49 Union Avenue, #3, Memphis, TN 38103

Phone: 901-579-9861

Email: saskew01@midsouth.rr.com

Directions: Longleaf is 6 miles West of the Suncoast Parkway on State Road 54.

From St. Petersburg/Clearwater/Palm Harbor/Tarpon Springs take East Lake Road to Little Road; go left on Little Road to State Road 54 and take a right (east) on State Road 54, approximately 1 mile to the entrance of Longleaf.

From Tampa, Longleaf is located just 30 minutes north of the Tampa International Airport. Take the Suncoast Parkway north to State Road 54 (exit 19) and go west (left), only 6 miles to the Longleaf entrance.

Lyman Village

Location: Lantana, Florida

Status: Under construction; project completion anticipated August 2002

Summary: Lyman Village contains 43 townhomes and 16 single-family homes on 4.12 acres. Prices range from about $90,000 to $150,000.

History: The property acquired in June 2000, was excess land owned by the Town of Lantana and the subject of a Request for Proposals as stimulus for redevelopment of the immediate neighborhood. The community sold out in about 14 months.

Special Features: Pool and cabana, white picket fences, alley-fed homes, affordably priced New Urbanism

Site Information: 59 homes on 4.12 acres on the east side of Broadway between Hypoluxo Road and Lantana Road east of I-95 and west of US 1 in Lantana

Project Costs: $6.5 million

Financing: GMAC Mortgage, Horsham, Pennsylvania and Community Financing Consortium, West Palm Beach, Florida

Marketing: Lyman Village targets first-time homebuyers who want new construction in eastern Palm Beach County for under $100,000 for townhomes and $150,000 for single-family homes. The project is marketed by New Urban Communities.

Developer: Tim Hernandez and Kevin Rickard, New Urban Lyman, LLC

Address: 398 NE 6th Avenue, Delray Beach, FL 33483

Phone: 561-279-8706 x 201

Email: thernandez@newurbancommunities.com; krickard@newurbancommunities.com

Site Planner/Architect: Erick Valle, Jaime Correa, Estela Valle, Correa Valle Valle and Partners

Address: 194 Minorca, Coral Gables, FL 33134

Phone: 561-747-6336 x 202

Email: evalle@urbanism.com

Architect: Scott Disher, Sean Naeger, Scott Blakeslee Disher Architects

Address: 2400 High Ridge Road, Suite 100, Boynton Beach, FL 33426

Phone: 561-733-8800 x 219

Email: snaeger@sbdassociates.com; sdisher@sbdassociates.com

Landscape Architect: Brad Swanzy, Land Design South

Address: 1280 N. Congress Avenue, Suite 215, West Palm Beach, FL 33409

Phone: 561-478-8501

Address: bswanzy@landdesignsouth.com

Public Official: Michael Bornstein, Town Manager, Town of Lantana

Address: 500 Greynolds Circle, Lantana, FL 33462

Phone: 561-540-5010 Email: mbornstein@microserver.lantana.org

Directions: I-95 to Hypoluxo Road. Go east on Hypoluxo Road to Broadway and then north on Broadway to the site, which is on the east side of Broadway between Bloxham and Branch Streets.

Miami Lakes Town Center

Location: Miami Lakes, Florida

Status: Under construction

Summary: Miami Lakes Town Center is an example of New Urbanist work combining traditional “main street” design with modern techniques for retail planning and management. Dover, Kohl & Partners, working with specialists in security design, traffic engineering, and visual merchandising, devised the plan within the “spiral” framework of irregular blocks established by the late planner Lester Collins, who originally laid out the larger plan for Miami Lakes.

History: A four-day charrette was conducted in March 1995 to develop the plan. Follow-up work has included design guidelines and a design for renovation and expansion of an existing cinema.

Special Features: Apartments and offices above the shops, twin plaza locations for entertainment, and “liner buildings” around parking garages are features of the plan.

Site Information: Approximately 75 acres within the 5 square miles of a 1960s “new town” suburb.

Costs: Long-term development plan; no build-out estimates available.

Financing: Conventional private financing

Marketing: Miami Lakes Town Center is marketed as a mixed-use Main Street with surrounding blocks of apartment, resort hotel, office buildings, and cinema. The area is marketed by Retail Estate, Inc.

Developer: Carol Graham Wyllie and Bill Graham, Jr., The Graham Companies

Address: 6460 Main Street, Miami Lakes, FL 33014

Phone: 305-821-1130

Email: william.graham@grahamcos.com

Architect: Roger Fry

Address: 2791 Bird Avenue, Miami, FL 33133

Phone: 305-446-7787

Town Planner / Urban Designer: Dover, Kohl & Partners

Address: 5879 Sunset Drive, Suite 1, South Miami, FL 33143

Phone: 305-666-0446

Email: info@doverkohl.com

Directions: Take I-95 from downtown Miami to State Road 836 (Dolphin Expressway) west to State Road 826 (Palmetto Expressway). Go north on 826 to Miami Lakes Drive and go right on Miami Lakes Drive east to Ludlam Road (NW 67th Avenue). Go left on Ludlam Road north to Main Street Miami Lakes and go left.

Miami Springs Downtown

Location: Miami Springs, Florida

Status: Plan adopted by Miami Springs City Council in January 2001

Summary: Revitalization plan and strategy to transform downtown Miami Springs

History: In late 2000, an intense public participation process began in Miami Springs. Meetings were held in order for the planning team to gain local knowledge. The following ideas summarize the plan, which was created with citizen input: preserve and capitalize on uniqueness; make it pedestrian friendly; “balance” (don’t overbuild or overdo it); focus on management and policy; and cultivate meaningful public input.

Special Features: The Plan calls for residential infill development, business improvement, building renovations, and infrastructure improvement to create a thriving downtown and Main Street. The plan incorporates both physical changes as well as organizational and policy modifications. Located near the airport and a major employment center, the city receives substantial amounts of non-local traffic. Despite the large customer base passing through the streets every day, many of the businesses are not expanding or capturing this potential market. Façade renovations and residential infill will bolster the retail presence for all the businesses in the downtown and strategic additions of small office spaces and dwellings will add a daily customer base to the area. Having the merchants cooperate on advertising and operating hours will support the advantages that a Main Street can have over typical strip development, spurring the non-local traffic into leaving dollars behind in Miami Springs. In the downtown area, a large circular plaza, which also functions as a traffic circle, provides a well-known landmark for the City of Miami Springs.

Site Information: Approximately 90 acres adjacent to the Miami River Canal and centered on Westward Drive, the local main street

Costs: Long-term development and preservation plan; no build-out estimates available

Financing: To be determined

Marketing: The Miami Springs Plan historic area is marketed to households and businesses attracted to the 1920s character established by founder, aviation pioneer Glenn Curtiss. Special emphasis is placed on attracting senior residents from nearby suburban areas of Miami Springs as the community matures.

Public Official: Office of the Mayor

Address: 201 Westward Drive, Miami Springs, FL 33166

Phone: 305-805-5000

Town Planner/Urban Designer: Dover, Kohl & Partners

Address: 5879 Sunset Drive, Suite 1, South Miami, FL 33143

Phone: 305-666-0446

Email: info@doverkohl.com

Directions: From I-95, take the I-195 exit, Exit 7 towards Miami Beach/State Road 112/Airport. Keep left at the fork in the ramp and merge into Airport Expy. Take the US 27/Okeechobee Road exit and go straight on Okeechobee Road/Florida 27. Turn right onto Southeast 1st Ave., then left onto Hialeah Drive/Florida 944 west, which becomes Curtiss Pkwy., and enter the circle towards the heart of downtown.

Mizner Park

Location: Boca Raton, Florida

Status: Completed

Summary: A downtown mixed-use project often called the village-within-the-city, Boca Raton’s Mizner Park offers shopping, dining, cultural facilities, residences, and offices in a “European” setting. The Park draws international visitors with round-the-clock activity and open space. Two-thirds of the site is devoted to public areas an amphitheater, broad arcade walkways, and the park-like Plaza Real, which is dotted with gazebos, benches, and fountains and serves as a community-gathering place. Entertainment facilities, restaurants, and a department store anchor the retail. The project’s privately developed components consist of 235,000 square feet of retail space, including 54 shops, 7 restaurants, a department store, and cinema complex; 279,000 square feet of office space in a Class A office tower and above-retail professional offices; 272 rental apartments and townhomes; and public parking for more than 2,500 vehicles. Mizner Park is owned by the City of Boca Raton and leased to the commercial developer and cultural users under 99-year leases.

Project History: Developed over a decade, Mizner Park was created as a catalyst to revitalize Boca Raton’s downtown in the face of competition in the western areas. It replaced a 15-year-old strip mall and demonstrated how a public-private partnership could work. Since introduced, Mizner Park has spurred an increase in downtown property: assessed project area value from $26,845,522 in 1990 (Boca Mall) to $68,254,478 (Mizner Park) in 2002; value of the entire downtown from $16,234,649 in 1992, when part of Mizner’s Phase I opened, to $229,795,741 in 2002; square footage from 0.075 million in 1982 to 1.774 million in 2001.

Special Features: Mizner Park offers a unique mix of commercial, residential, and cultural uses. The entire north end is designated as the Centre for the Arts at Mizner Park, with three major components: the 44,000-square-foot Boca Raton Museum of Art; a new state-of-the-art amphitheater/concert green to open November 2002; an 1,800-seat, future concert hall with administrative and educational facilities; and a 1,913-seat, eight-screen cinema, offering foreign, arts, and independent feature films.

Site Information: The 30-acre project area is configured as a two-city block traditional downtown, and has four main mixed-use buildings, four parking garages, as well as on street and valet parking. Any use that can be placed on an upper floor such as offices, housing, or cinemas has been; all ground-floor space is used either for retail or for entrances. Outdoor dining plazas and apartment balconies overlook the park and contribute to site activity. The architecture adapts 1920’s architect Addison Mizner’s highly articulated style to today’s uses.

Costs: Site improvement costs, $6,490,051; construction costs, $33,087,390; soft costs, $19,966,603; total development costs, $59,544,044.

Financing: Bonds financed the city’s purchase of Mizner Park’s land. TIAA-CREF and commercial lenders financed the commercial and residential components.

Marketing: Themeline “Mizner Park Refresh Yourself” reflects the lifestyle experience and events that give people reasons to visit frequently. Leasing is strong: retail component, more than 98% leased; professional office space (above retail) 92% leased; seven-story Class A office tower, 81% leased; 272 apartments/townhomes, a vacancy factor of 3%, largely due to normal turnover.

Developer: Crocker Downtown Development Associates

Managed by: Codina Realty Services, Inc., ONCOR International

433 Plaza Real, Suite 355, Boca Raton, FL 33432

Phone: 561-362-0606

Email: jroot@codina.com

Owner: Teachers Insurance & Annuity Company

Address: 730 Third Ave., 8th Floor, New York, NY 10017

Architect: Cooper Carry & Associates

112 South Alfred Street, Suite 100

Alexandria, VA 22314

Phone: 703-519-6152

Website: www.coopercarry.com

Public Official: Jorge Camejo, Community Redevelopment Agency

Address: 201 W. Palmetto Park Road, Boca Raton, FL 33432

Phone: 561-367-7070

Email: jcamejo@ci.boca-raton.fl.us

Directions: From 1-95 take the Palmetto Park Road exit and go east to Federal Highway. Turn left and Mizner Park will be on the right.

Moss Park Community

Location: Southeast Orange County, Florida

Status: Permitted and under construction

Summary: Moss Park is a new community planned around the international headquarters for Campus Crusade for Christ International (CCCI) and Wycliffe Bible Translators (WBT). CCCI has been open for approximately three years; WBT will open spring 2002. The community has been designed to fit within the existing rural landscape of southeast Orange County. A hotel designed as a small country inn, a school site, and adjacent park and community village are part of the plans. The rural Village Center is a classic small-town grid of buildings within an existing oak forest. The village is centered on the intersection of a main street and a village square.

History: The World Center Development of Regional Impact (DRI) was approved in 1995, which established the CCCI headquarters. Subsequent to this, property was assembled and WBT made the decision to relocate to Central Florida from California. A master plan was developed and a DRI was subsequently approved in 2000. The headquarters for WBT will open spring of 2002; residential development should be underway before the end of 2002.

Special Features: Moss Park responded to the rural environment of Moss Park Road by clustering development in selected areas to preserve significant amounts of open space along the road corridor. The Village Center has a commitment to preserve 50% open space adjacent to the road. The school site is located at a distance from the road, with a community park and playing fields set next to the road in an open rural character.

Site Information: 1,388 gross acres; 610 acres lakes, wetlands, and open space; 2,675 dwelling units; 15-acre elementary school; and 20-acre community park

Financing: Private investors

Marketing: Target families with children, empty nesters, and professional singles and couples

Developer: Jay Berlinsky, Community Development Company

Address: CNL Center at City Commons

Address: 450 South Orange Avenue, 12th Floor, Orlando, FL 32801

Phone: 407-835-3220

Fax: 407-650-1073

Planner: Glatting Jackson Kercher Anglin Lopez Rinehart, Inc.

Address: 33 East Pine Street, Orlando, FL 32801

Phone: 407-843-6552

Email: jrutmann@glatting.com

Public Official: Commissioner Clarence Hoenstine

Address: 201 South Rosalind Avenue, 5th Floor

Orlando, FL 32801

Phone: 407-836-7350

Email: district4@ocfl.net

Directions: From Downtown Orlando go east on the East West Expressway (408). Go south on the Greeneway (417). Exit on Narcoossee Road, go north to Moss Park Road, turn right (east) go 2.7 miles to the entrance to CCCI.

Naples Fifth Avenue South

Location: Naples, Florida

Status: 50% complete

Summary: Fifth Avenue South was the economic center of Collier County until the late 1970s. The opening of the Coastland Center Mall in 1977 and the establishment of office parks in north and east Naples diminished its prominence and vitality. Occupancy on Fifth Avenue declined to 60%-70% in the early 1980s and persisted through the decade. In 1993 Duany Plater-Zyberk & Company developed a Fifth Avenue Master Plan that was well received and adopted by the Naples City Council in 1994. Numerous buildings have been constructed since then and the street is once again the “hub” of Collier County.

History: To develop a redevelopment plan for Fifth Avenue South, a charrette was held in the fall of 1993 and new development code adopted in 1994. The key points of the redevelopment plan were: the encouragement of mixed-use development; the establishment of rational parking requirements; finding a location for community art and theatre groups to establish an art museum and community theatre; and the implementation of meaningful design standards. All of these goals were accomplished and the results exceeded expectations.

Special Features: The Sugden Community Theater, Von Liebig Art Center, and Cambier Park

Site Information: The site is on an east west road starting 3 blocks east of the Gulf of Mexico at the intersection of 3rd Street South and 5th Avenue South and running eastward for 6 blocks where it intersects with 9th Street (US 41).

Costs: $30-40 million

Financing: Public financing has been accomplished through a Community Redevelopment Agency. The Sugden Theatre and Von Liebig Art Center have been funded with private donations and grants and are debt free.

Marketing: Not much marketing was or is being done to attract investors and customers.

Developer: Ann Walker, City of Naples

Address: 835 8th Street South, Naples, FL 34102

Phone: 941-213-1039

Architect: Tom Low, Duany Plater-Zyberk & Company

Address: 1023 SW 25th Avenue, Miami, FL 33135

Phone: 305-644-1023

Email: tom@dpz.com

Landscape Architect: Ellin Goetz

Address: 185 10th Street South, Naples, FL 34102

Phone: 941-643-0077

Email: JStropes@msn.com

Public Official: Peter VanArsdale (retired), City Council

Address: 185 10th Street South, Naples, FL 34102

Phone: 941-253-8246

Email: petervanarsdale@earthlink.net

Directions: Take either US 41 or I-75 to Naples. US 41 makes a hard right north at 5th Ave. On I-75, take exit 15, follow SR 84 (Davis Blvd.) to US 41 to 5th Ave. South.

Naranja Lakes

Location: Miami Dade County, Florida

Status: For sale

Summary: 1,500 home layout in the urban pattern prescribed in the Metro-Dade County Code for a Traditional Neighborhood Development

Project History: The devastation of Hurricane Andrew in 1992 hit a community called Naranja Lakes particularly hard. The community housed over 1,200 families living in an area of approximately 200 acres. Once the insurance companies issued checks, none of the families returned to rebuild the community. The 200 acres have since been cleared, and today there is 6-foot high grass and the pads of buildings past. A charrette to design a new mixed-use community on the abandoned site was conducted by Correa Valle Valle with Duany Plater-Zyberk & Company in 1996. The condominium consolidation is close to completion and the project awaits a developer.

Special Features: Public greens, community centers, lakes, canals, a mix of incomes and housing types

Site Information: 210 acres, two existing lakes and one canal

Costs: $ 100 million

Financing: Combination of private and public funding

Marketing: Todd Zimmerman and Laurie Volk in Clinton, New Jersey, provided the marketing studies for this project. As a Traditional Neighborhood Development, the project incorporates everything required for healthy daily living within walking distance. The project has a station along the express bus route on US 1. It also has a downtown area, workplace, a variety of residential types, and civic buildings.

Architect: Erick Valle, Correa Valle Valle and Partners

Address: 194 Minorca Avenue, Coral Gables, FL 33134

Phone: 305-476-9212

Email: evalle@urbanism.com

Landscape Architect: Gary Greenan

Address: 1221 Dickinson Drive, Coral Gables, FL 33146

Phone: 305-284-3438

Public Official: Gilbert Blanco, Planner, Miami-Dade County

Address: Zoning Department, Miami-Dade County, FL 33128

Phone: 305-375-2810

Directions: Take the Florida Turnpike South to the 112 Ave. Exit. Turn right to the first street intersection and then turn left. The site starts on the right-hand side.

Northlake Park at Lake Nona

Location: Orlando, Florida

Status: Permitted, under construction with the school and two neighborhoods completed

Summary: The 500-acre NorthLake Park at Lake Nona is a community of neighborhoods each of which consists of 120 home sites ranging from townhomes through various-sized single-family lots. The neighborhoods feature attractive parks with significant landscaping and amenities and pedestrian-friendly “front porch” architecture. The development is a traditional community conceived in the spirit of Orlando’s great neighborhoods and boasts preservation of approximately 145 acres of wetlands and approximately 40 acres of parks.

History: Project began in 1998; school completed in 1999; homes completed and delivered to owners Spring 2000

Special Features: A 22-acre campus, anchored by a two-level, 126,566 square-foot building, is the centerpiece of NorthLake Park at Lake Nona. Initiated by the private landowner, a partnership with the Orange County Public Schools, City of Orlando, YMCA, and Orlando Regional Healthcare System resulted in a community center that hosts a public elementary school, adult education, and family recreation and wellness facilities. Located in a new planning district of the city, the project also represents the first realization of sustainable community initiatives that will maintain the high quality of life for citizens with minimal depletion of natural resources.

Financing: Cash

Marketing: The marketing and advertising program for Lake Nona includes: a Preview Center; billboards designed for image with directions strategically placed; and advertising targeting young families, empty nesters, and retirees with a variety of ad layouts. The Lake Nona/NorthLake Park website is designed to offer the latest community information.

Developer: Lake Nona Land Company

Address: 9801 Lake Nona Road, Orlando, FL 32827

Phone: 407-855-0513 Email: rlyon@lakenona.com

Architect: SchenkelShultz

Address: 200 East Robinson Street, Suite 300,

Orlando, FL 32801

Phone: 407-872-3322

Email: Dan Tarczynski dtarczynski@schenkelshultz.com

Planning and Landscape Architect: Glatting Jackson Kercher Anglin Lopez Rinehart, Inc.

Address: 33 East Pine Street, Orlando, FL 32801

Phone: 407-843-6552

E-mail: dmetzger@glatting.com

Engineering: Donald W. McIntosh Associates, Inc.

Address: 2200 Park Avenue North, Winter Park, FL 32789

Phone: 407-843-6552 E-mail: dmetzger@glatting.com

Public Official(s): Mayor Glenda E. Hood

Address: City of Orlando, 400 South Orange Avenue, Orlando, FL 32801

Phone: 407-246-2221 Website: www.cityoforlando.net

Commissioner Don Ammerman (District 1)

Address: City of Orlando, 400 South Orange Avenue, Orlando, FL 32801

Phone: 407-246-2001

Website: www.cityoforlando.net

Directions: NorthLake Park is located between State Road 528 (BeeLine Expressway) and State Road 417 (Greeneway) on the west side of Narcoossee Road in Orlando.

Old Palm Grove

Location: Delray Beach, Florida

Status: Entitlements in process; construction to begin August 2002

Summary: Old Palm Grove contains 12 three-story townhomes, and 34 single-family detached homes on 4.7 acres. Prices for the townhomes are expected to start in the $280,000s. Prices for the single-family homes are expected to start in the $390,000s. This is the largest single-family home community to be built in south Palm Beach County east of US 1 in over 10 years. The single-family lots are between 3,200 and 5000 square feet.

History: The property is an assemblage. Current uses of the land are a restaurant, some single-family homes, and a nursery. The property is located in the North Federal Highway Redevelopment Area.

Special Features: Two internal squares, specimen tree relocation, and mix of alley and front loaded homes

Site Information: 46 homes on 4.7 acres located on the east side of North Federal Highway (US 1) at Royal Palm Boulevard in Delray Beach, Florida

Costs: $20 million

Financing: City National Bank, Fort Lauderdale, Florida

Marketing: Old Palm Grove is targeted toward more affluent buyers who want single-family detached and attached new construction east of US 1 in south Palm Beach County. The single-family component will be the largest single-family development in south Palm Beach County in over a decade. The development is marketed by New Urban/RFC Developers.

Developer: Tim Hernandez, Kevin Rickard and Richard Caster, New Urban/RFC Developers, LLC

Address: 398 NE 6th Avenue, Delray Beach, FL 33483

Phone: 561-279-9998

Email: thernandez@newurbancommunities.com; krickard@newurbancommunities.com; rfcaster@bellsouth.net

Site Planner: Joe Kohl, Dover, Kohl & Partners

Address: 5879 Sunset Drive, Suite 1, South Miami, FL 33143

Phone: 305-666-04463

Email: jkohl@doverkohl.com

Architect: Rick Gonzales, REG Architects

Address: 120 South Dixie Highway, Suite 201, West Palm Beach, FL 33401

Phone: 561-659-2383

Email: rick@regarch.com

Public Official(s): Paul Dorling and Jeff Costello, City of Delray Beach

Address: 100 NW 1st Avenue, Delray Beach, FL 33444

Phone: 561-243-7041

Email: jcostello@delrayplanning.org; pdorling@delrayplanning.org

Directions: I-95 to Atlantic Ave. Go east on Atlantic Ave. to US 1 and then north on US 1 past George Bush Blvd. to the site, located on the east side of US 1 at Royal Palm Blvd.

Old San Carlos Boulevard

Location: Fort Myers Beach, Florida

Status: The comprehensive plan and the Old San Carlos/Crescent Street Special Area Plan have been adopted. Traffic-calming and streetscape improvements in the final design are being implemented. A new civic pavilion has been designed to mark the entrance to the island at the foot of the sky-bridge. Revision of the town’s land development regulations is currently underway.

Project Summary: Spikowski Planning Associates and Dover, Kohl & Partners were retained by the City of Fort Myers Beach to create a master plan intended to facilitate redevelopment and economic revitalization of this waterfront area.

History: The Old San Carlos area in Fort Myers Beach is an older waterfront neighborhood that was once the downtown heart of the island, stretching from Matanzas Pass to the Gulf of Mexico. The original entrance to the island was via a low swing-bridge that deposited residents and visitors at the north end of Old San Carlos Boulevard, once the main street of the island. The area has stagnated economically and deteriorated physically since a newly constructed sky-bridge from the mainland bypassed the historic urban grid. Today the area is poised for a renaissance. Some property owners have already undertaken modest upgrades and are interested in doing more. The newly incorporated town government is focused on the details of renewal throughout the core area. The area’s unique beach-to-bay connection gives it character and opportunities for high visibility.

Features: Street transformed to once again be a signature public space on the island, promoting infill development and pedestrian-friendly design; public access to the waterfront and waterfront views along Old San Carlos Boulevard

Site Information: Approximately 15 acres in a built-up area on one of Florida’s barrier islands

Costs: Long-term development and preservation plan; full build-out estimates not available; $2 million in initial street improvements

Financing: Combination of conventional private financing for private infill projects, plus Tax Increment Financing, transportation impact fees, gas taxes, and a benefit-assessment district

Marketing: San Carlos Boulevard is being marketed as a quirky, small-town beach resort environment, with mixed-use development catering to visitors and local residents, including retail and entertainment, plus hotels.

Architect: Marice’ Chael, Chael, Cooper & Associates Address: 5879 Sunset Drive, Suite 1, South Miami, FL 33143

Phone: 305-666-0185

Email: mchael@chaelcooper.com

Town Planner: Bill Spikowski, Spikowski Planning Associates

Address: 1617 Hendry Street, Suite 416, Fort Myers, FL 33901-2947

Phone: 941-334-8866 Email: bill@spikowski.com

Urban Designer: Victor Dover, Dover, Kohl & Partners

Address: 5879 Sunset Drive, Suite 1 South Miami, FL 33143

Phone: 305-666-0446 Email: info@doverkohl.com

Public Official: Marsha Segal-George, Town Manager

Town of Fort Myers Beach

Address: 2523 Estero Boulevard, Fort Myers Beach, FL 33931

Phone: 941-765-0202

Email: marsha@fmbeach.org

Directions: From I-75 near Fort Myers, exit Daniels Road and go west. Follow the signs to Fort Myers Beach. After crossing the big bridge and seeing the Gulf of Mexico beyond, you have arrived.

Osceola Woods

Location: Jupiter, Florida

Status: Under construction; development scheduled to be completed November 2003

Summary: Osceola Woods is one of the urban districts in Abacoa. It contains 146 three-story townhomes on about 12.85 acres. Base prices range from the $170,000s to the $190,000s. Site design was the result of collaboration between the developer, its consultant, DeGuardiola Development, the town of Jupiter planning department, and the Town’s urban consultant, OBM Miami, Inc.

History: The property was acquired in July 2000 from DeGuardiola Development. Sales began in February 2001 and 90 homes were sold during the first year of sales.

Special Features: Greenway, internal, squares pool, and cabana, all homes alley fed, and excellent block structure

Site Information: A 12.85- acre site with 146 townhomes located on the southeast corner of University and Central Boulevards in Jupiter; part of the Abacoa Community.

Project Costs: $27 million

Financing: SunTrust Bank, West Palm Beach

Marketing: Osceola Woods is targeted to young professionals, couples, and second homebuyers as one of the few communities in northern Palm Beach County where a new home can be purchased for under $200,000. The ameni

ties of Abacoa, the central location of Osceola Woods within Abacoa on the greenway, and close proximity to Florida Atlantic University, the Abacoa Town Center, and the stadium make Osceola Woods particularly attractive. The development is marketed by New Urban Communities.

Developer: Tim Hernandez and Kevin Rickard, New Urban Abacoa, LLC

Address: 398 NE 6th Avenue, Delray Beach, FL 33483

Phone: 561-279-8706 x 201

Email: thernandez@newurbancommunities.com; krickard@newurbancommunities.com

Site Planner and Landscape Architect:

Don Hearing, Cotleur-Hearing

Address: 1934 Commerce Lane, Suite 1,

Jupiter, FL 33458

Phone: 561-747-6336 x 202

Email: don_hearing@cotleur-hearing.com

Public Official(s): Stephanie Thoburn, John Sickler, and Sam Shannon, Town of Jupiter

Address: 210 Military Trail, Jupiter, FL 33458

Phone: 561-746-5134 Email: stepha@jupiter.fl.us; sams@jupiter.fl.us; johns@jupiter.fl.us

Directions: I-95 to Donald Ross Road. Go east on Donald Ross Road to Central Blvd. and then north on Central to University Blvd. Go east on University Blvd. to the site, on the southeast corner of Central and University Blvds.

Park Avenue Plan

Location: Winter Park, Florida

Status: Streetscape improvements completed; first new building constructed

Summary: The Park Avenue Master Plan is the result of an extensive effort that combined retail planning, streetscape design, cost-estimating, revising land development regulations, and consensus-building through a public process. Park Avenue is a historic main street with traditional urban form. The project required that the designers carefully preserve the physical elements that contribute to the success of the street while integrating much needed improvements. It was also important to not be obvious that “the streetscape designers were here.” Work products included design rules for new buildings (since followed by the SunTrust Plaza building developed by Rollins College), and a “Maintenance of Business” plan to minimize disruption during reconstruction of the street. Later, Dover, Kohl & Partners was hired by Rollins College to design an entrance to the campus, forming the visual terminus to Park Avenue’s south end.

History: The project grew out of a “Winter Park in Perspective” conference in 1994 and a subsequent charrette, followed by a series of public consensus-building sessions.

Special Features: Traffic calming, narrowing of streets, widening of sidewalks, first new street-oriented buildings in recent times, and terminated vista

Site Information: Historic main street, 3,000 linear feet long, centered on Central Park

Costs: Street improvements approximately $4 million

Financing: City of Winter Park special taxing district

Marketing: Park Avenue Plan area is being marketed as an urban village with upscale main street, city hall, restored 19th century central park, private liberal arts college, Amtrak station, and art museum, and as a showcase for old Florida lifestyle, livability, and the arts.

Developer: George Herbst, Vice President, Faison

Associates, and Rollins College

Address: 1000 Holt Avenue, Winter Park, FL 32789

Phone: 407-646-2117

Email: gherbst@rollins.edu

Architect: Marice Chael, Chael, Cooper & Associates

Address: 5879 Sunset Drive, Suite 1, South Miami, FL 33143

Phone: 305-666-0446

Email: mchael@chaelcooper.com

Landscape Architect: Glatting Jackson Kercher Lopez Anglin Rinehart

Address: 33 East Pine Street, Orlando, FL 32801

Phone: 407-843-6552

Email: jhood@glatting.com

Public Official: Don Martin, Director of Community Development, City of Winter Park

Address: 401 Park Avenue South, Winter Park, FL 32789

Phone: 407-599-3440

Email: dmartin@ci.winter-park.fl.us

Directions: Exit I-4 North of Orlando at Faribanks Ave. Go east, about one mile to Park Ave.

Pointe West

Location: Vero Beach, Florida

Status: The infrastructure for the North and Central Villages is substantially complete, as well as the Town Center gazebo, sports pavilion, and 15-acre polo, soccer, and recreational field. The first phase of the single-family Central Village residential section is 80% sold and the Villa area 40% sold. Residents have been living in Pointe West since late 2000.

Summary: Pointe West is a 600 +/- acre Traditional Neighborhood Development (TND) community in Vero Beach. The community offers: parks, pedestrian walkways, a public transportation element, the Park of Commerce (at the entrance), a 10 +/- acre Town Center element, an elementary school site (a co-op effort with the Indian River School Board), a retirement community element, and an equestrian element on the outer fringe of Pointe West.

History: The developer, OnSite Management Group, in a cooperative effort with the Treasure Coast Regional Planning Council and the Indian River County Planning Department, approved the Pointe West conceptual plan. The cooperative effort of public and private entities produced an ordinance for Indian River County that outlines TND concepts. The ordinance produced design guidelines, codes, and regulations that allowed OnSite Management Group to turn an abandoned grove land and a previously failed development, which had been partially demolished, into the vision that now is Pointe West. Official groundbreaking was in 2000.

Special Features: The community was approved for 750 single-family homesites; 449 multi-family residences; recreational activities available with over 5 miles of trails and numerous parks; 170,000 square feet for commercial, retail, and office space; town center consisting of 10 acres of professional offices, boutiques, and restaurants; an equestrian facility with three polo fields, riding trails, and half-acre estate sites; a championship golf course with pro-shop, club facilities, and learning center; and The Lakes at Pointe West, a unique retirement community located within 40 acres of Pointe West.

Site Information: A 600 +/- acre community following TND concepts located 1½ miles east of I-95 on State Road 60, between 74th and 82nd Avenues in Vero Beach. The site consists of 40 acres dedicated to The Lakes at Pointe West (an active retirement element), and the Polo Grounds at Pointe West, a 90-acre equestrian facility on the outer fringe of the community.

Costs: $10.1 million infrastructure

Financing: Fidelity Federal and First National Bank and Trust

Marketing: The community has a mix of families, empty nesters, and retirees as a result of advertising in local, regional, and national publications.

Developer: OnSite Management Group, Inc.

Address: 1999 Pointe West Drive, Vero Beach, FL 32966

Phone: 772-794-4577

Email: requests@pointewestflorida.com

Builder/Designer: Southern Classic Homes/Diane Hager Design and Illustrations

Address: 1999 Pointe West Drive, Vero Beach FL 32966

Phone: 772-794-5355

Email: requests@pointewestflorida.com

Landscape Architect: Neihaus Landscape and Design

Address: 7380 61st Street, Vero Beach, FL 32967

Phone: 772-562-0060

Public Official: Bob Keating, Community Planning Director, Indian River County (with Stan Boling and John McCoy)

Address: 1840 25th Street, Vero Beach, FL 32960

Phone: 772-567-8000

Public Official: Michael Busha, Treasure Coast Regional Planning Council

Address: 301 East Ocean Boulevard, Suite 300, Stuart, FL 34994

Phone: 772-221-4060

Directions: From I-95, take Exit 68 and go east on State Road 60. Pointe West is approximately 1.5 miles from I-95 and less than 1 mile from the only regional mall and the Indian River Community College in Vero Beach. The grand entrance is on the right (south) side of US 60.

Rosemary Beach

Status: Residential structures: 243 completed and 162 under construction or permitted. Commercial structures: 10 live-work completed, under construction or permitted for construction, and 4 arcade units under construction.

Location: Northwest South Walton County, Florida

Summary: Rosemary Beach is a mixed-use new town development founded on the principles of New Urbanism and Traditional Neighborhood Development. The town plan, created by Andres Duany and Elizabeth Plater-Zyber, was inspired by beach towns found near coastal cities. 12 housing types include features such as: cantilevered balconies and porches; garden walls; hipped roofs made of metal, shingle, or shakes; wood siding, cedar shingle or stucco finishing; and colorations of natural tones. Cars are restricted to rear alley ways. Town Center includes live-work and arcade buildings, town hall and courtyard, and post office. Pocket parks varying in size, scale, and character comprise the boardwalk experience. Construction has occurred at an accelerated rate due to a strict construction building commencement and completion policy.

History: Established in 1995, by Leucadia Financial Corporation, the town includes an original 49 +/- acre tract south of Route 30-A and a second 58 +/- acre tract north of Route 30-A. The existing town commercial activity includes: a town hall and post office building complex; café-wine bar with sidewalk seating; bed and breakfast; antique store; ice cream/candy shop; fine art studio and gallery; casual eatery; sundry shop; 50 room +/- inn with pool; loft project with attached ground floor commercial; and a wide assortment of additional small retail uses with opportunities for upstairs living.

Special Features: Home-lined pedestrian boardwalk promenades, the town’s signature features, which provide distant views of the Gulf of Mexico; a scenic corridor connecting the community to a larger regional pathway and ultimately to other new communities that intersect the pathway; and interpretive butterfly garden to educate residents about the coastal scrub-dune landscape of the town.

Site Information: The town sits upon one of the highest points along this section of the Florida coastline. The land was not drastically graded, and instead, roadways conform to the contours of the land, eliminating the need for storm water drains or holding ponds. Utilities are underground and permeable concrete pavement was used to act as a filter, allowing water to percolate through to the sand below.

Marketing: Target consumers are families, singles, and empty nesters that enjoy good architecture and a relaxed beach lifestyle.

Developer: Patrick Bienvenue, Founder-Rosemary Beach Land Company and President-Leucadia Financial Corporation

Address: Leucadia Financial Corporation, 529 East South Temple, Salt Lake City, UT 83102-1089

Phone: 801 524-1657

Email: pbienvenue@lukfin.com

Architect/Town Planner: Andres Duany and Elizabeth Plater-Zyberk, Duany Plater-Zyberk & Company

Address: Duany Plater-Zyberk & Company, 1023 Southwest 25th Avenue, Miami, FL 33135

Phone: 305-644-1023

Email: info@dpz.com

Town Architect: Richard M. Gibbs, Rosemary Beach Land Company

Address: Rosemary Beach Land Company, P.O. Box 611070, Rosemary Beach, FL 32461

Phone: 850-231-2900

Email: rmgibbs@rosemarybeach.com

Landscape Architects: Keith LeBlanc, Keith LeBlanc Landscape Architecture, Inc.

Address: 535 Albany Street No. 5A, Boston, MA 02472

Phone: 617-426-6475

Email: keithl@kl-la.com

Engineer(s): Chris Weddle, Aurora Civil Engineering, Inc.

Address: 1202 Tech Boulevard, Suite 203, Tampa, FL 33619

Phone: 813-620-4566

Email: chris@auroracivil.com

Directions: From I-10, exit at County Road 331 and follow the signs south to US Highway 98. Turn left on Highway 98, continue approximately 10 miles to Inlet Beach and turn right onto County Road 30-A. Rosemary Beach is ¼ mile west of the Highway 98 junction.

Seaside

Location: Walton County, Florida

Status: Most of the residential is complete; approximately 50% of the commercial and 30% of the civic is complete.

Description: Located on the Gulf of Mexico, Seaside is an 80-acre mixed-use community permitted for 340 single-family homes, 289 apartments, 83 condominium units, 134 hotel units, 18,030 square feet of commercial space, and 40,500 square feet of civic space. The Seaside plan proposed a traditional American settlement pattern, approximating the size and components of a historic southern town, as an alternative to the usual suburban configuration. Streets are designed to encourage walking, and pedestrian paths along back lot lines offer alternative routes. The retail district is designed as a civic downtown, with a green, conference center doubling as a town hall, post office, and small inn, and the beach is accessible by boardwalks over protected dunes. Public buildings are designed by architects chosen for their sympathy with the regional vernacular architecture. Designs for private buildings are reviewed for their adherence to the master plan and zoning code, which is meant to generate an environment similar to a pre-1940 southern town; lots are required to have native landscaping and lawns are prohibited.

History: The project began in 1981 on land owned by Robert Davis. Davis and town co-founder Daryl Davis started Seaside with the idea of reviving Northwest Florida’s building tradition, which has produced wood-frame cottages adapted to the climate, including deep roof overhangs, ample windows, buildings off the ground, and ample porches. The town’s co-founders asked Miami architects Andres Duany and Elizabeth Plater-Zyberk to help them plan a community that would combine the traditions that had produced these buildings. The four studied the buildings in the context of small towns and gradually evolved the idea that the small town was the approximate model to use in thinking about laying out streets and squares and locating the various elements of the community. In 1982, initial home sales began and the master plan and urban code for Seaside were drafted.

Special Features: Pedestrian-friendly design, unique architecture, Seaside Interfaith Chapel, Seaside Neighborhood School

Site Information: Located on the Gulf of Mexico

Financing: Various

Marketing: Seaside is marketed as a holiday town. Although unified by a consistent theme, a different approach is used for real estate sales, the hospitality operation, and thecommerciall retail center. The strength of the marketing efforts has evolved around the benefits of educating the public about the design principles that are the foundation for Seaside. While the real estate sales target high-end demographics, the other htmects of Seaside are much more broad-based.

Developer: Robert Davis, Seaside Community Development Corporation

Address: P. O. Box 4730, Seaside, FL 32459

Phone: 850-231-4224

Planners: Andres Duany and Elizabeth Plater-Zyberk, Duany Plater-Zyberk & Company

Address: 1023 SW 25th Ave., Miami, FL 33135

Phone: 305-644-1023

Email: Andres@dpz.com

Directions: From Panama City, take US 98 west to Walton County. Turn left on CR 30-A and go nine miles to Seaside.

South Miami Hometown

Location: South Miami, Florida

Status: The initial demonstration project, the renovation of Southwest 59th Avenue, now popularly known as “Dorn Avenue,” brought new life to one end of the downtown. Numerous other building renovations and infill development have followed throughout the district and total overhaul of the Sunset Drive streetscape has been completed, incorporating wider sidewalks, reducing travel lanes, and incorporating traffic calming design. There is now much greater pedestrian activity. In 1998, the City formed a Community Redevelopment Agency, using the Hometown Plan as the framework for physical planning.

Summary: The Hometown Plan and the subsequent Hometown District Overlay Ordinance apply New Urbanism in traditional town centers. In 1992, the study area became the subject of intensive public involvement to address the need for revitalization of the commercial main street district along Sunset Drive in the heart of the City of South Miami. The master plan includes transit-oriented development, protection for historic structures, and improvements to the streets and commercial buildings. Hometown Station is a complex of planned additions within and around the South Miami Metrorail Station, which will include live-work units and a mixed-use commercial building fronting a new town square as “liner buildings” to an existing garage. A future phase will include a courtyard apartment building atop a portion of the garage. The plan for Hometown Station will leverage improvements to the immediate physical environment in order to promote economic revitalization over a much larger area. The edges of the buildings will feature storefronts along the sidewalks and arcades overhead, and new balconies, terraces, and windows will overlook the streets and the square to transform the station area into a unified, urbane place, tying the Metrorail station to South Miami’s main street, Sunset Drive.

History: Dover, Kohl & Partners assisted the not-for-profit entity, South Miami Hometown, Inc., with promoting a redevelopment of the study area, preparing a work program, conducting a charrette to design a detailed master plan, and writing an overlay ordinance. This work reintroduced traditional town planning techniques and hands-on public participation in South Miami.

Special Features: Sunset Drive was narrowed from five lanes to three. The demonstration block of Dorn Avenue features outdoor dining and formerly blank walls that were opened with storefronts, windows, and plan-instituted “build-to lines” in place of setbacks.

Site Information: 55-acre area in inner-ring suburb south of Coral Gables

Costs: Long-term redevelopment plan, estimated at $1 billion over 50 years

Financing: Individual building projects privately financed, street improvements financed by tax increment funds

Marketing: The area is marketed as a revitalized, historic mixed-use downtown with a full range of entertainment, employment, civic uses, varied housing and services, centered on the Metrorail transit station, with Hometown Station as the centerpiece.

Public Official: Richard Lorber, Planning Director, City of South Miami

Address: 6130 Sunset Drive, South Miami, FL 33143

Phone: 305-663-6327

Email: RLorber@cityofsouthmiami.net

Town Planner/Urban Designer: Dover, Kohl & Partners

Address: 5879 Sunset Drive, Suite 1

South Miami, FL 33143

Phone: 305-666-0446

Email: info@doverkohl.com

Architect: Chael, Cooper & Associates

Address: 5879 Sunset Drive, Suite 1

Miami, FL 33143

Phone: 305-666-0446 Email: mchael@chaelcooper.com

Directions: Take I-95 from downtown Miami and travel south on US1 South to Sunset Drive. Turn right on Sunset Drive and Hometown Station will be on the right.

SouthWood

Location: Tallahassee, Florida

Status: Under construction

Summary: With the components of a small-town of the past, SouthWood is a 3,200-acre, mixed-use community where residents can live, learn, work, and play. Built around a traditional village center overlooking a 123-acre park and lake, SouthWood will house specialty shops, restaurants, entertainment facilities, professional offices, and residences. SouthWood is based on a respect for local history, customs, and style. Organized into defined neighborhoods, SouthWood’s homes are located amid 1,000 acres of parks, lakes, and ponds. The community’s sense of style is reflected in the historic SouthWood House, a 135-year old Southern-style mansion. At build out (expected in 2020), SouthWood will include approximately 4,700 homes.

History: Initial project dates back to 1986 by the St. Joe Paper Company. Postponed in 1989, the planning was resumed in 1997 when the St. Joe Company, under new Chairman and CEO Peter S. Rummell, acquired Arvida. Master planning started in June 1998 by Sasaki Associates, Inc. This master plan resulted in a Development of Regional Impact in September 2000.

Special Features: SouthWood’s town boundaries contain Florida State University’s Developmental Research School (K-12) and a Catholic high school. A K-8 public school within town boundaries is also planned. SouthWood includes a semi-private golf club.

Site Information: SouthWood is set on 3,200 acres of rolling hills, lined with moss-draped oaks and crystal blue lakes located four miles from Florida’s Capitol.

Financing: Internal financing

Marketing: SouthWood is marketed as primary, pre-retirement, and retirement homes.

Developer: Arvida

Address: 215 S. Monroe Street, Suite 702, Tallahassee, FL 32301

Phone: 850-513-0131

Email: Tim_Edmond@Arvida.com

Architect: Sasaki Associates, Inc.

Address: 64 Pleasant Street, Watertown, MA 02171

Landscape Architect: Patrick L. Hodges Landscape Architecture

Address: 220 East College Avenue, Suite A, Tallahassee, FL 32301

Directions: From I-10 in Tallahassee, travel south on Capital Circle NE for 5 miles. Turn left onto Old St. Augustine Road 1.2 miles. Turn right onto Southwood Plantation Road 1.7 miles.
SouthWood

Location: Tallahassee, Florida

Status: Under construction

Summary: With the components of a small-town of the past, SouthWood is a 3,200-acre, mixed-use community where residents can live, learn, work, and play. Built around a traditional village center overlooking a 123-acre park and lake, SouthWood will house specialty shops, restaurants, entertainment facilities, professional offices, and residences. SouthWood is based on a respect for local history, customs, and style. Organized into defined neighborhoods, SouthWood’s homes are located amid 1,000 acres of parks, lakes, and ponds. The community’s sense of style is reflected in the historic SouthWood House, a 135-year old Southern-style mansion. At build out (expected in 2020), SouthWood will include approximately 4,700 homes.

History: Initial project dates back to 1986 by the St. Joe Paper Company. Postponed in 1989, the planning was resumed in 1997 when the St. Joe Company, under new Chairman and CEO Peter S. Rummell, acquired Arvida. Master planning started in June 1998 by Sasaki Associates, Inc. This master plan resulted in a Development of Regional Impact in September 2000.

Special Features: SouthWood’s town boundaries contain Florida State University’s Developmental Research School (K-12) and a Catholic high school. A K-8 public school within town boundaries is also planned. SouthWood includes a semi-private golf club.

Site Information: SouthWood is set on 3,200 acres of rolling hills, lined with moss-draped oaks and crystal blue lakes located four miles from Florida’s Capitol.

Financing: Internal financing

Marketing: SouthWood is marketed as primary, pre-retirement, and retirement homes.

Developer: Arvida

Address: 215 S. Monroe Street, Suite 702, Tallahassee, FL 32301

Phone: 850-513-0131

Email: Tim_Edmond@Arvida.com

Architect: Sasaki Associates, Inc.

Address: 64 Pleasant Street, Watertown, MA 02171

Landscape Architect: Patrick L. Hodges Landscape Architecture

Address: 220 East College Avenue, Suite A, Tallahassee, FL 32301

Directions: From I-10 in Tallahassee, travel south on Capital Circle NE for 5 miles. Turn left onto Old St. Augustine Road 1.2 miles. Turn right onto Southwood Plantation Road 1.7 miles.

St. Croix

Location: Lauderdale Lakes, Florida

Status: Under permitting

Summary: St. Croix is built on a 12.5-acre site. The development includes 16,600 square feet of commercial uses and 246 residential units. The intent is to recuperate the traditional urban fabric by means of blocks, streets, and plazas in order to provide the vital downtown still missing in the middle of Lauderdale Lakes.

History: St. Croix is built on ½ of a greyfield site that is the remnant of a derelict 250,000-square-foot shopping center as an important strategy for the reconstitution of the city. The mixed-use infill project required extensive amendments of the Broward County Comprehensive Plan and the Zoning Ordinance of Lauderdale Lakes. The codes that permitted mixed-use development in the city were guided by suburban standards and demanded unrealistic amounts of open space and excessive amounts of parking.

Special Features: This is the first mixed-use “work force” housing project in Broward County. The project is comprised of 246 dwelling units and 16,000 square feet of retail; a plaza and a green used to carve-out public spaces; a pool house and a tot lot; and a club house that occupies the first floor of one of the buildings around the plaza.

Site Information: 12.5 acres on a site previously occupied by a shopping center and large expanse of htmhalt

Project Costs: $25 million

Financing: Bond financing

Marketing: St. Croix is marketed for its different building-types and mix of housing, which configure new blocks and plazas, and for its amenities, which include a clubhouse, laundry facility, mail kiosk, and small pool house. The Cornerstone Group markets St. Croix.

Developer: Jorge Lopez, Cornerstone Group

Address: 2121 Ponce de Leon Boulevard, Penthouse, Coral Gables, FL 33134

Phone: 305-443-8288

Architect: Erick Valle, CVV and Partners

Address: 194 Minorca Avenue, Coral Gables, FL 33134

Phone: 305-476-9212

Email:evalle@urbanism.com

Landscape Architect: Jimmy Socash, Jimmy Socash Landscape Architects

Address: 12420 SW 20th Street, Miramar, FL 33027

Phone: 954-442-2345

Public Official: Gary Jones, Building Director, The City of Lauderdale Lakes

Address: Building and Zoning Department, City Hall,

4300 NW 36th Street, Lauderdale Lakes, FL 33319

Phone: 954-535-2752

Directions: Take I-95 to the Oakland Park exit. Go west to State Road 7/US 441 and go right for ½ of a block.

Stuart Redevelopment Area

Location: Stuart, Florida

Status: Comprehensive plan amendments and zoning amendments in progress and scheduled to be approved in June 2002; three major permits comprising 450 residenial units and more than 60,000 square feet of commerical uses are waiting code approval.

Summary: Using the Duany Plater-Zyberk & Company 1986 Downtown Plan for Stuart, the expansion redevelopment plan proposes 3 new districts and the reconstitution of 3 existing neighborhoods, including: an arts and crafts district with live-work units, a marina district with hotels and new boat slips, an ecological district with a restoration project, and the Frazier Creek and Potsdam Neighborhoods. The project also uses a large collection of public art to create a culture of iconography. New design guidelines and consequent amendments to the comprehensive plan and Community Redevelopment Agency (CRA) goals and objectives complement the project.

History: The original redevelopment plan was designed by Duany Plater-Zyberk & Company in 1987, and successfully implemented. The plan created a great synergy in the downtown area. The study area included all the surrounding neighborhoods. Correa Valle Valle and Urban Design Associates were hired in October 2001 to produce a master plan for the preservation of neighborhood areas adjacent to the downtown and for the development of new areas on the northern portion of the redevelopment area.

Special Features: The master plan includes a mixed-use arts district, a live-work district, two complete neighborhoods, a nautical village, and two restoration projects with great ecological values.

Site Information: Redevelopment Area, City of Stuart, Florida

Costs: Under study

Financing: Under study

Public Official: Kim Delaney, Planning Director, City of Stuart

Address: City Hall, 121 SW Flagler Avenue, Stuart, FL 34990

Phone: 561-288-5306

Email: kdelaney@cityofstuart.com

Architect: Jaime Correa, CVV and Partners

Address: 194 Minorca Avenue, Coral Gables, FL 33134

Phone: 305-476-9212

Email: jcorrea@urbanism.com

Civil Engineer: Rick Hall, Hall Planning and Engineering, Inc.

Address: 1237 North Adams Street, Tallahassee, FL 32303

Directions: Take I-95 to the Stuart exit. Take Colorado Ave. east to Confusion Corner, which is at the center of the CRA Extension and includes approximately 2 square miles of Riverfront properties within the City of Stuart.

Town of Tioga

Location: Gainesville, Florida

Summary: The Town of Tioga is a 500+/- acre Traditional Neighborhood Development. Tioga has been recognized as the recipient of the 2001 National Homebuilders Association (NAHBA) American Living Gold Award for Smart Growth and the 1998 Florida Association of Realtors “E.N.V.Y” award for best community in the State of Florida. The town is planned for approximately 1000+ units, designed around a pedestrian park or “esplanade” as the spine of the project. The linear park is an old tree-covered farmer’s road that will eventually run about 2 miles. Construction of the Town Center is scheduled to start in the fall of 2002. The community will also have institutional and recreational uses linked via alley ways, common areas, sidewalks, and bike lanes to facilitate pedestrian activity. Parks, amenities, and planned retail districts are within walking distance of all residents, while 20% of the development is preserved as green space. Home price ranges run from $160,000 to $500,000.

History: Tioga is built near the site of an old, abandoned settlement by the same name. In 1994, co-founders, Mike and Luis Diaz, with the help of University of Florida Professor Orian Wetterquist, began the process of planning the community. The first phase started in the fall of 1996 and Phases 6 and 7 are now under construction.

Special Features: Preserving the trees and ecosystem began with an extensive, two-year tree survey and natural-features evaluation. Innovative land planning resulted in a historic, oak-lined farm road becoming the backbone of the community, providing a 2-mile pedestrian park within a block of all residences in the development. Some streets and sidewalks are also aligned with existing hedgerows.

Site Information: The project is located 5 miles west of Gainesville. The original planned unit development is 280 acres with 537 residential units, 2 acres neighborhood retail, 5 acres institutional, 52 acres community open space, 1-1/2 acres RV and boat storage, and 220 acres reserved for expansion. Currently, the density is 2 units per acre with plans to increase it closer to 4 units per acre by completion.

Costs: $55 million (projected)

Financing: Private joint venture

Marketing: In 1997, Tioga received a national sales and marketing award from NAHBA for its marketing strategy of providing homes for “body, mind, and spirit.” Tioga Realty Inc., is a developer-owned real estate company.

Developer: Luis A. Diaz Co-founder, Dibros Corp.

Address: PO Box 13461, Gainesville, FL 32604

Phone: 352-331-6220

Email: diaz@townwoftioga.com

Website: http://www.townoftioga.com

Directions: I-75 to Gainesville. Take the Newberry Road (State Road 26) exit and travel west approximately five miles to the Town of Tioga, which is on the south side of the road located directly across the street from West End Golf Course.

University Heights

Location: Gainesville, Florida

Status: The University Heights Urban Design Guidelines handbook was created to aid property owners and the city in improvement and redevelopment projects. The University Heights Special Area Plan code has subsequently been adopted, giving legal “teeth” to concepts in the master plan. The city has engaged in negotiations with the Florida Department of Transportation to redesign University Avenue as a pedestrian-friendly, urban street.

Summary: The City of Gainesville commissioned a planning study to revitalize University Heights, an older neighborhood adjacent to the University of Florida. University Heights has good urban fabric with many historic buildings, although University Avenue, the neighborhood’s main street, is currently unattractive to new development. The city and the Metropolitan Transportation Planning Organization endorsed the plan for redesign and downsizing of the avenue. The special area plan code is sensitive to the historical character of the place and emphasizes appropriate building types.

History: Dover, Kohl & Partners conducted a charrette to determine community goals and to reconcile them with an economic development strategy for University Avenue and the sensitive redevelopment of housing stock for the neighborhood. The participation of more than 70 local residents helped the design team create a viable plan that would accommodate community needs.

Special Features: The restoration of important thoroughfare into a neighborhood Main Street, infill development respecting traditional neighborhood fabric, mixed-use development along a new neighborhood green and historic preservation

Site Information: Urban area adjacent to major university

Costs: Long-term redevelopment and preservation plan; build-out estimates not available

Financing: Expected to be primarily conventional private financing for private infill projects and public funding for infrastructure improvements

Marketing: University Heights is marketed as a mixed-use neighborhood and primary corner immediately adjacent to the University of Florida Campus. Marketing is expected to be oriented to students, faculty, and staff, along with hospital workers and Gainesville residents who work downtown but dislike the commute to the suburbs.

Public Official: Dom Nozzi, Senior Planner, City of Gainesville

Address: City of Gainesville Department of Community Development, Comprehensive Planning, Administration, Gainesville, FL 32601

Phone: 352-334-5022

Email: nozzidj@ci.gainesville.fl.us

Town Planner/Urban Designer: Dover, Kohl & Partners

Address: 5879 Sunset Drive, Suite 1, South Miami, FL 33143

Phone: 305-666-0446 Email: info@doverkohl.com

Directions: From I-95 North, take the Florida Turnpike North and exit at Exit 16 on the left towards State Road 826 West. Merge onto the Florida Turnpike North. Take the State Road 121 exit, Exit 74, toward State Road 331/Gainesville/Williston. Keep left at the fork in the ramp and turn left onto Florida 121 North and stay straight to go onto Florida 331 North. Turn slight left onto Florida 329 North and turn left onto Florida 24/Florida 26. Turn left onto Florida 20 East/Florida 329 South. Florida 20 East/Florida 329 South becomes Florida 329 South.

Village of Bridgewater

Location: Southwest Orange County, Florida

Status: Under construction

Summary: Approved by the Orange County Board of County Commissioners in 1999, the Village of Bridgewater is a privately initiated Specific Area Plan (SAP) within the Horizon West planning area consisting of 3 neighborhoods with approximately 7,300 dwelling units. The SAP provides for a distinct village designed to include no less than 1,000 acres of net land area and consisting of 2 to 4 neighborhoods surrounding a Village Center. Each neighborhood contains a variety of housing types and a neighborhood school site.

History: The Board of County Commissioners adopted the Village Land Use Classification and Horizon West Study Report and incorporated new Future Land Use Objectives and related Policies. Adoption of the Future Land Use map amendment and the related Village classification policies created the mechanism to convert this rural land to urban development in 1995.

Special Features: Highlighted Principles call for: complete neighborhoods with an integrated mix of land uses allowing for a variety of lot and block size; a diversity of housing types to support the life cycle of Village residents; connected natural areas in greenbelts and parks; publicly accessible open space internal to the neighborhood; donated land for public infrastructure; identifiable spaces where residents have a sense of place; a Village Center with commercial, civic, cultural, healthcare, and recreational uses; school/park focal point for each neighborhood within walking distance of all residences; streetscapes with trees, alleys, and recessed garages to minimize automobile focus; connectivity between uses; complete network of streets, and pedestrian and bike paths; transit; reclaimed water reuse with each village.

Site Information: Site consists of two neighborhoods within the Village that are being developed as Stillwater Crossings and Center Bridge in Summerport, a 697.34-acre master-planned community within the Village of Bridgewater. Summerport Center is a 53.43-acre mixed-use commercial center with 253,886 square feet retail/services, 33,000 square feet office, and 320 multifamily dwelling units designed to serve three neighborhoods with an estimated population of 17,448 at build-out. Residential neighborhoods include 828 dwelling units and 19,000 square feet of neighborhood commercial.

Costs: Full build-out costs for infrastructure, housing, and commercial development are estimated at $1.2 billion.

Financing: Combination of internal and conventional financing

Marketing: The Village is being marketed as a mixed-use development with close proximity to Orlando’s tourism corridor and with a range of housing types that appeal to a full scale of life points, from single people to dual income no children couples, and from young families to retired seniors.

Developer: Chip Webb, Summerport Land

Address: PO Box 2501, Orlando, FL 32802

Phone: 407-897-3330 x 204

Email: cwebb@cfl.rr.com

Planner: A. Geoffrey McNeill, AICP, RLA

Miller Sellen Conner & Walsh

Address: 214 East Lucerne Circle, Orlando, FL 32801

Phone: 407-422-3330

Email: Geoff.McNeill@mscwinc.com

Engineer: Kevin Walsh, PE, Miller Sellen Conner & Walsh

Address: 214 East Lucerne Circle, Orlando, FL 32801

Phone: 407-422-3330

Email: Kevin.Walsh@mscwinc.com

Public Official: David Heath, Orange County

Address: PO Box 1393, Orlando, FL 32801

Phone: 407-836-5610

Email: david.heath@ocfl.net

Directions: From I-4 Eastbound take County Road 535/Lake Buena Vista exit and go north on County Road 535 to Fiquette Road. Project is at the intersection on the west side of County Road 535.

From the Florida Turnpike take the Winter Garden exit and go west on State Road 50. Go south on County Road 535 to Fiquette Road. Project is at the intersection on the west side of County Road 535.

Washington Ridge

Location: Lakeland, Florida

Status: Under construction

Summary: In conjunction with The Communities Group and the Lakeland Housing Authority, Torti Gallas is designing this $60 million comprehensive neighborhood revitalization project through a public-private partnership, including a HOPE VI revitalization grant from HUD in 1999 for $21.1 million. These funds will be leveraged by nearly $38 million in support from community partners, including public-housing residents, social-service organizations, area businesses, city and county agencies, the developer, and the housing authority. An additional $10 million in Tax Increment Financing has been pledged by the city through the creation of a Community Redevelopment Area.

The Washington Ridge Community Renaissance combines both physical and economic revitalization. Physical redevelopment will reduce population density at the two public-housing sites, while increasing the number of housing choices for lower-income families. One hundred mixed-income families are anticipated to move into the neighborhood in the new and renovated homes, while a similar number of lower-income families will have the opportunity to relocate to new and renovated houses elsewhere within the city and county. The community’s economic base will be rebuilt with $3.5 million pledged by stakeholders and $3.2 million of HUD funds, resources that will go toward skills training, social-service programs, and business-development initiatives, and area businesses have pledged 688 new jobs. New jobholders will have the incentive of homeownership guaranteed by $13 million in below-market-rate financing commitments and $2 million in down-payment assistance.

Site Information: 40-acre site made up of 2 separate communities, Lake Ridge and Washington Park, plus approximately 60 single-family off-site infill sites.

Special Features: Washington Ridge is designed in the concept of a traditional village with residential, retail, and recreation within close proximity to give residents convenient access to common amenities.

Costs: Approximately $48 million

Financing: Funded under a mixed-finance approach, including a HOPE VI grant from the US Department of Housing and Urban Development.

Marketing: The project is being marketed to mixed-income renters and homebuyers.

Developer: Jaime Bordenave, The Communities Group

Address: 1012 N Street, NW, Washington, DC 20001

Phone: 202-667-3002

Email: bordenave@thecommunitiesgroup.com

Architect: Tom Gallas, Torti Gallas and Partners

Address: 1300 Spring Street, Silver Spring, MD 20910

Phone: 301-588-4800

Email: tgallas@tortigallaschk.com

Landscape Architect: Glatting Jackson Kercher Lopez Anglin Rinehart

33 East Pine Street, Orlando, FL 32801

Phone: 407-8483-6552

Email: jruttman@glatting.com

Public Official: Herb Hernandez, Lakeland Housing Authority

Address: 430 Hartsell Avenue, Lakeland, FL 33815

Phone: 863-687-2911

Directions: From Tampa, take I-4 east to Memorial Pkwy. (I-92). Take Memorial Pkwy. east to Florida Ave. Make left on Florida Ave. to 1400 block.

WaterColor

Location: South Walton County, Florida

Status: Under construction

Summary: Situated in Northwest Florida on the Gulf of Mexico, WaterColor offers coastal living and a place where residents can relax in nature and stroll along white-sand beaches and towering dunes. Neighborhoods radiate around a Town Center and Cerulean Park, a space of open lawns and flowing water that connects the Gulf to the community’s 220-acre rare, coastal dune lake. The town has a distinctly southern flair, but with architectural influences from the Caribbean and French Acadia.

Homes are organized by compatible styles and colors to define each neighborhood with a character of its own. Deep front porches oriented toward the street and homes with regional architectural elements give shade from the sun and capture the ocean breeze. Restaurants, shops, and community and commercial buildings also feature southern accents and are scaled for village living. Bike and walking trails traverse the community, bringing residents closer to nature. Landscaping takes advantage of native plants, many found only on Florida’s northwestern beaches. At full build out, the community will include 1,140 residences.

History: WaterColor is being developed by Arvida, the community development arm of the St. Joe Company, and was master-planned by Jaquelin T. Robertson of Cooper, Robertson & Partners, New York.

Special Features: The WaterColor Inn, designed by David Rockwell, restaurants, a Gulf-front beach club, boat house, tennis club, Cerulean Park, Western Lake, and dune walkovers and boardwalks

Site Information: WaterColor is built on land held by St. Joe since 1927.

Financing: Internal

Marketing: Beachfront second home

Developer: Arvida

Address: 1701 E. County Highway 30-A, Suite 201, Santa Rosa Beach, FL 32459

Phone: 850-231-6555

Email: kterrell@arvida.com

Architect: Cooper Robertson & Partners

Address: 311 West 43rd Street, 13th Floor, New York, NY 10036

Phone: 212-247-1717

Landscape Architect: Susan Nelson and Warren Byrd Landscape Architects

Address: 408 Park Street, Charlottesville, VA 22902

Phone: 804-984-1358

Directions: WaterColor is located on the Gulf of Mexico, 25 miles east of Destin on Scenic Highway 30-A, between Seaside and Grayton Beach State Park.

WaterSound Beach

Location: Walton County, Florida

Status: Under construction

Summary: Collaborating with a team of architects, including Robert A.M. Stern, Jaquelin Robertson, David Rockwell, Bill Ramsay, Graham Gund, and EDAW, The St. Joe Company is creating a development on the coast of Florida’s Great Northwest. Located on the Gulf of Mexico, WaterSound Beach is a secluded seaside village that weaves together three similar resort and residential neighborhoods amid 250 acres of white-sand beach and dunes. A blend of American traditions, WaterSound calls to mind the historic seaside villages of the Northeast, but relocated to the coastal geography of the South. The combination is expressed architecturally in a marriage of northern clapboard, shingles and shakes with the shaded porches, awnings, and overhangs that guard against the heat and glare of the southern sun.

History: Initial conceptual master planning completed in 2000 by Robert A.M. Stern Architects, New York. EDAW, landscape architects and land planners in Atlanta, redesigned the project in 2001.

Special Features and Site Information: In a relatively small area, several ecosystems overlap to provide a rich and varied landscape for the residents of WaterSound. Composed of typical coastal uplands and wetlands, the village is highlighted by a formation of white sand dunes. The community abuts Camp Creek Lake, a freshwater dune lake next to the Gulf beach. At times the dune field extends 800 feet and ranges as high as 35 feet. Beyond the dune fields and the beachside lake, the property combines stands of tall pine trees, natural coastal vegetation, and protected wetland areas.

Financing: Internal

Marketing: Beachfront second home, retirement home

Developer: Arvida

Address: 1701 E. County Highway 30-A, Suite 201, Santa Rosa Beach, FL 32459

Phone: 850-231-6555

Email: kterrell@arvida.com

Architectural Design Guidelines: Robert A.M. Stern Architects

Address: 460 W. 34th Street, New York, NY 10001

Phone: 212-967-5100

Email: c.pizzi@ramsa.com

Master Planner and Landscape Architect: EDAW

Address: The Biltmore, 817 W. Peachtree Street, Suite 770, Atlanta, GA 30308

Phone: 404-870-5339

Email: hillt@edaw.com

Design Architects: Graham Gund Architects

Address: 47 Thorndike Street, Boston, MA 02141

Phone: 617-511-5100

Email: georgec@grahamgund.com

Cooper Robertson & Partners

Address: 311 W. 43rd Street, 13th Floor, New York, NY 10036

Phone: 212-247-1717

Rockwell Group

Address: 5 Union Square West, 8th Floor, New York, NY 10003

Phone: 212-463-0334

Allison Ramsey Architects

Address: 1003 Charles Street, Beaufort, SC 29902

Phone: 843-986-0559

Production Architect: Glover Smith Bode

Address: 140 NW 63rd Oklahoma City, OK 73116

Phone: 617-511-5100

Email: wallinson@hargray.com

Directions: WaterSound Beach is located 5 miles east of WaterColor and Seaside on Scenic Highway 30-A in south Walton County, Florida.

Westlake Neighborhood

Location: Lake Park, Florida

Status: Under construction

Summary: The project includes 400 residential units, including 10 live-work units; 20,000 square feet of commercial uses; two clubhouses; a fountain circle; a paseo along a lake; and a mix of row houses and flats. It also incorporates squares, plazas, lakes, fountains, canals, greenways, bike paths, and an upland hammock preserve. As a Traditional Neighborhood Development (TND), the goal is to have an auto-sufficient neighborhood at the periphery of a town designed by John Nolen in the 1920s.

History: Located within a master plan designed by the Treasure Coast Regional Planning Council with a Traditional Neighborhood Ordinance by Dover, Kohl & Partners, Correa Valle Valle (CVV), designed a new neighborhood celebrating the spirit and intent envisioned by its citizens. CVV is also the architect of record.

Special Features: This work-force mixed-housing (townhouses and apartments) neighborhood is anchored by two club houses, a central fountain, a mail kiosk substituting for a local post office, and a tot lot. The development preserves an upland hammock making it into a neighborhood amenity, and is surrounded by water creating two man-made islands.

Site Information: 50 acres, water retention 45%; two acres of uplands landscape preservation

Costs: $18 million

Financing: Bond financing

Marketing: Westlake is marketed as the first affordable TND in the state. Marketing is managed by the Clinton Group, Inc.

Developer: Randy Rieger, Housing Trust Group of Florida, LLC

Address: 3225 Aviation Avenue, Suite 700, Coconut Grove, FL 33133

Phone: 305-860-8188

Architect: Jaime Correa, Correa Valle Valle and Partners

Address: 194 Minorca Avenue

Coral Gables, FL 33134

Phone: 305-476-9212

Email: jcorrea@urbanism.com

Landscape Architect: Alex Knight, Alex Knight, Inc.

Address: 269 Giralda Avenue

Coral Gables, FL 33134

Phone: 305-441-6511

Public Official: Terry L. Virta, AICP, Community Development Director, City of Lake Park

Address: 535 Park Avenue, Lake Park, FL 33403

Phone: 561-848-3485

Directions: I-95 to North Lake Blvd. Go east to Congress Ave. The site starts at the southwest corner of Congress Ave. and North Lake Blvd.

West Park Village

Location: Northwest Hillsborough County, Florida

Status: West Park Village is expected to sell out early in 2003.

Summary: West Park Village is located in the master-planned community of Westchase™ in Northwest Hillsborough County. It is Tampa Bay area’s largest traditional-style neighborhood and will have about 500 single-family and 1,200 multifamily homes when completed. Its homes offer broad porches, rear garages with apartments above, and neighborhood parks. Waterways, conservation areas, and a swim-and-tennis center are available for all Westchase residents.

History: Models opened in 1999. The developer began investigating Traditional Neighborhood Development (TND) designs six years ago. At the current pace, the community will sell out 2 years ahead of schedule.

Special Features: The West Park Village Town Center is a classic downtown area from a bygone era, and features 40,800-square-feet of retail. Businesses range from a spa to an Italian restaurant to a home-accessories store. Above the shops are 60 upscale apartment homes. Another 280 apartments are situated along the Town Center’s 3-acre village green.

Site Information: At 185 acres, West Park Village is on Linebaugh Avenue, just west of Sheldon Road.

Costs: Estimated development costs are $175 million, including infrastructure, amenities, single-family and multifamily residences, and retail space.

Financing: Horizontal infrastructure financed through the Community Development District; vertical construction financed with conventional bank financing

Marketing: West Park Village is primarily targeted toward families, empty nesters, and first-time buyers. TERRABROOK staff and five homebuilders coordinate marketing. Tampa-based Denton French & Daniel and John Heagney Public Relations handle advertising and public relations, respectively.

Developer: TERRABROOK®

Address: 3505 Frontage Rd. #145, Tampa, FL 33607

Phone: 813-286-8899

Email: bsewell@terrabrook.com

Architect: Cooper Johnson Smith Architects Inc.

Address: 102 South 12th St., Tampa, FL 33602

Phone: 813-273-0034

Email: admin@cjsarch.com

Land Planner: RTKL Associates Inc.

Address: 1250 Connecticut Ave. NW, #300,

Washington, DC 20036

Phone: 202-833-4400

Email: gmaule@rtkl.com

Landscape Architect: Basham Design Group, Inc.

Address: 8850 Goodby’s Executive Drive, Suite A, Jacksonville, FL 32217

Phone: 904-731-2323

Email: thegroup@bashamdesign.com

Public Official: Hillsborough County Board of County Commissioners

Address: PO Box 1110, Tampa, FL 33601

Phone: 813-272-5660

Directions: Travel on I-275 to Veterans Expressway. Take the Linebaugh Ave. exit west past the Westchase community entrance, which is at Sheldon Road.

WindMark Beach

Location: Gulf County, Florida

Status: Under construction

Summary: Overlooking St. Joseph Bay and blended into the natural environment, WindMark Beach recalls Old Florida. While it offers the latest in modern amenities, its setting and architecture suggest the community has been part of the beachfront for decades. Land and water are connected easily. Three community docks offer meeting places for socializing with friends and neighbors. Convenient paths throughout the 80-acre community lead WindMark residents to bay, beach, and docks, in harmony with natural surroundings.

History: Master planned by EDSA in 2000; permitted and platted in 2001; Construction of roads and utilities began in November 2001. Sales started in June 2001.

Special Features: Beach-front pool and community club; Stillwater Nature Preserve; and the St. Joseph Peninsula State Park and Nature Preserve, accessible by water from WindMark

Site Information: WindMark Beach is located on 80 acres

in Gulf County, Florida within two miles of the coastal village of Port St. Joe.

Financing: Internal

Marketing: Beachfront second home

Developer: Arvida

Address: PO Box 96, Port St. Joe, FL 32457

Phone: 850-227-1110

Email: john_hendry@arvida.com

Architect: EDSA

Address: 500 South Magnolia Avenue, Orlando, FL 32801

Phone: 407-425-3330

Email: jmiller@edsa.com

Landscape Architect: PBS & J

Address: 1901 Commonwealth Lane,

Tallahassee, FL 32303

Phone: 850-575-1800

Website: www.pbsj.com

Directions: Two miles north of Port St. Joe, beachside of Highway 98, 30 miles east on Highway 98 from Panama City.

Winter Park Village

Location: Winter Park, Florida

Status: The Dover, Kohl & Partners team shaped the initial concept and then others designed the architecture. Phase I of the project is complete and Phase II construction has begun. A new movie theater, shops, and restaurants have brought the property back to life; it was called “the retail leasing story of 1999″ and the press has trumpeted the Village’s “wow factor.” The new phase converts the upper floors of a department store to loft residences and begins the shift from surface parking to structured parking years ahead of projections.

Summary: Redevelopment of a greyfield mall into a traditional town center

History: Winter Park Mall, located in the heart of Winter Park, was hailed in the 1960s as a symbol of progress. The mall was designed to compete directly for customers against nearby Park Avenue, the city’s traditional main street. During the 1980s and early 1990s, Winter Park Mall steadily declined in sales and lost tenants, while Park Avenue maintained its vitality and grew stronger. Park Avenue is now known as “the Main Street that killed the Mall.” In 1997, a consultant team from Dover, Kohl & Partners, Glatting Jackson, et al., and Gibbs Planning devised a plan for the redevelopment of the mall. Created on the city’s behalf, the plan was worked out in consultation with the prospective developer. The developer has since constructed the first phase, transforming the mall into the new Winter Park Village.

Special Features: The old mall was redeveloped to establish an urban sense of place along Orlando Avenue. The plan showed how to reweave the circulation pattern originally intended for this area of the city. An interconnected network of streets and rationally shaped blocks are now being built.

Site Information: When the Winter Park Mall later failed, it damaged the surrounding neighborhood, city, and region. Now the land is being redeveloped. The new redevelopment plan was illustrated in two ways. The first, an “Immediate Redevelopment” drawing showed a way the property could be redeveloped to maximize certain commercial opportunities. It is configured to look and function like a normal part of an urban village. Compared to conventional malls or strip shopping centers, this development in its new form is more pedestrian friendly, more attractive from both inside and out, and more practical. Over time, a seamless reconnection with the surrounding city will form.

Cost: No estimates available

Financing: Conventional private financing; future phases may involve Tax Increment Financing.

Marketing: Winter Park Village is marketed as a mixed-use, urban entertainment center with upscale restaurants, cinema, offices, and loft apartments.

Developer: Brett Hutchens, Don Casto Organization

Address: 401 Cattlemen Road, Suite 108, Sarasota, FL 34232

Phone: 407-628-4148

Architect: Arnold Gitten, Dorsky Hodgson & Partners

Address: One Financial Plaza, Suite 2400, Fort Lauderdale, FL 33309

Landscape Architect: Glatting Jackson Kercher Lopez Anglin Rinehart

Address: 33 East Pine Street, Orlando, FL 32801

Phone: 407-843-6552

Email: jrutmann@glatting.com

Town Planner / Urban Designer: Dover, Kohl & Partners

Address: 5879 Sunset Drive, Suite 1, South Miami, FL 33143

Phone: 305-666-0446

Email: info@doverkohl.com

Public Official: Don Martin, Director of Community Development, City of Winter Park

Address: 401 Park Avenue South, Winter Park, FL 32789

Phone: 407-599-3440

Email: dmartin@ci.winter-park.fl.us

Directions: Exit I-4 north of Orlando at Fairbanks Ave. Go east, about 1 mile to Park Ave. From Park Ave., go west on Morse Blvd. (north of Fairbanks Ave.) to US 17 and 92, turn right. Winter Park Village is a short distance to the right.

Winter Springs Town Center

Location: Winter Springs, Florida

Status: In 1998, the Winter Springs City Commission adopted the conceptual master plan and in 1999 adopted a graphic code, both produced by Dover, Kohl & Partners. Based upon the master plan, the city won a $5 million grant from Florida’s State Trails and Greenways Program to purchase the network of green spaces. Phase I, which includes a portion of the main street and a supermarket, is under construction.

Summary: The Master Plan for Winter Springs marks the return to a traditional Town Center for a maturing suburban city. Winter Springs residents gave clear instruction to the designers: the Town Center should be a dense, mixed-use, and intensive development, but it should not resemble the strip shopping centers they have grown to dislike. The Town Center District Code was created to replace Winter Springs’ existing land development regulations, to legalize mixed-use development as envisioned in the master plan. The highly graphic, simple-to-use code pre-approves desirable development, making it easier for developers to “do the right thing.”

History: The City of Winter Springs today is comprised mostly of individual Planned Unit Developments with no coherent or defined center. The Winter Springs Town Center and its adjacent neighborhoods, designed for approximately 200 acres of strategically located mostly undeveloped land, will serve as the focal point for the entire city.

Special Features: A main street (Tuskawilla Road) will link a “Market Square” to the quiet center, “Magnolia Square.” Adjacent and connected to these core areas are mixed-use neighborhoods that will include office, retail, and residential uses. Pedestrian and bike paths will lead into the heart of the Town Center and equestrian/hiking trails will line the periphery. The trails will feature views of pristine wetland preserve areas.

Site Information: Approximately 280 acres

Costs: Long-term development plan, estimated at $400 million over 15 years

Financing: Combination of conventional private financing and public-private partnerships for infrastructure

Marketing: Winter Springs Town Center is marketed as a mixed-use main street and accompanying blocks of small office buildings and varied housing, plus an anchor supermarket, city halls, and high school.

Developer: Shane Doran, Vice President for Business Development, The James Doran Company

Address: 1051 Johnnie Dodds Boulevard., Mount Pleasant, SC 29464

Phone: 803-881-7550

Architect: LS3P Architects

Address: Charleston, SC

Email: info@ls3p.com

Landscape Architect: Forest Michael, ASLA, Michael Design Associates

Address: 400 W. New England Avenue, Suite 1, Winter Park, FL 32789

Phone: 407-645-3377

Town Planner/Urban Designer: Dover, Kohl & Partners

Address: 5879 Sunset Drive, Suite 1, South Miami, FL 33143

Phone: 305-666-0446

Email: info@doverkohl.com

Public Official: Charles Carrington, Community Development Director, City of Winter Springs

Address: 1126 East SR 434, Winter Springs, FL, 32708

Phone: 407-327-5970

Email: ccarrington@wintersringsfl.us

Directions: go I-4 North from Orlando. After approximately 10-15 miles, take S.R. 434 and go east.

After 8 miles, you will see Winter Springs City Hall on your left. City Hall is at the edge of the project site.

Continue on S.R.434 to Tuskawilla Rd. This area will become the main street of the project.

Winthrop

Location: Brandon, Florida

Status: The first phase, including the neighborhood center, is under construction.

Summary: A 148-acre model project designed to counter Brandon’s predominantly suburban settlement patterns. The site is bisected by nearly 40 acres of wetlands and includes an out parcel with a gas station.

History: Winthrop was master planned by Duany Plater-Zyberk & Company in 2000 through a charrette involving county representatives, neighbors, and interested business owners. The project was coordinated with the draft Traditional Neighborhood Development Land Development coding the county had underway.

Special Features: Wetlands preserved into a continuous and pedestrian-friendly network of parks, linked to urban civic spaces, greens, squares, and playgrounds; civic buildings interspersed at special focal points and terminating vistas marking significant topographical locations; and neighborhood center that features a conventional big-box retail anchor incorporated into the main street of a traditional neighborhood. Visible from two collector roads and with the requisite layer of accessible front parking, the box (a supermarket) has been sited to one side with retail buildings that, along with shops across the street, begin to define a main street into the town. In addition, the developers have converted one of the original ranch structures into a community facility, the Barn Theater, which includes the sales offices for the development.

Site Information: When built, Winthrop will have approximately 167,000 square feet of commercial uses (retail and office space), 184 townhouses, 50 live-work units, 286 apartments, 228 detached single-family units, among which will be small houses, side-yard houses, and villas.

Financing: To date, a combination of private equity financing, with some private investor financing

Marketing: Winthrop has been marketed primarily within the local Brandon community through direct media contact and public presentations. The local newspapers have covered the project extensively since its origination.

Developer: John Sullivan, PA, Millennium Center Construction, Inc.

Address: PO Box 2638, Brandon, FL 33509

Phone: 813-681-8717

Architect: James A. Moore, AIA, HDR, Inc.

Address: 2202 North Westshore Boulevard., Suite 250, Tampa, FL 33607

Phone: 813-282-2491

Email: jamoore@hdrinc.com

Public Official: Ray Chiaramonte, AICP, Assistant Director, Tampa/Hillsborough City/County Planning Commission

Address: 601 East Kennedy Boulevard., 18th Floor, County Center, Tampa, FL 33601

Phone: 813-272-5940

Email: rayc@plancom.org

Directions: From Tampa take Crosstown Expressway east to US-301. Head south on 301 to Providence Road and turn left. The project is at the southeast corner of the intersection of Providence Road and Bloomingdale Ave.

NOTE: The projects listed on this page are those that were described in the 2005 Guidebook to New Urbanism in Florida.